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Drumeo Gab Podcast

Are ya tired of hearing, "so, like, uhh talk to me about how you started playing drums" in drumming podcasts? I'm gonna say, probably not as much as the guests are. I dunno, I think it's better to cut to the chase and explore pinpoint moments in their lives by forming curiosities around my research :0 IF YOU ARE DOWN FOR THAT; WELCOME! (Side Note: I strongly believe that the best part of the podcasting experience for listeners is the ability to connect with the host. So, don't be shy :)
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Feb 16, 2020

“It’s not about the drums. It’s about the song.”

Ash Soan is a British drummer from Norfolk, GB. Both he and his Windmill Studio have caught everyone’s attention. I know that Ash’s commanding and slippery groove caught mine. For those of you out there who grew up listening to anything with Bernard Purdie, Steve Gadd or Manu Katche’s fingerprints on it, chances are high that you will instantly love Ash’s sound. 

In over twenty years experience, Ash has recorded 56 top ten records. He was also, until recently, the drummer for the UK television show “The Voice” for a tenure of seven years. Some of the artists that he has worked with are Cher, Robbie Williams, Adele, Snow Patrol, Billy Idol, James Morrison, Trevor Horn, Rod Stewart, Seal and the list goes on and on. 

His career is one where hard work and luck met at the right time and things took off from there. In this interview you will get to hear that story, his thoughts on modern drumming, second-hand weed, first take and; just listen to it already!

Ash endorses Gretsch Drums, Remo, Vic Firth, Zildjian

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Ash’s famous musician neighbour in London back in 91’ and how that changed the course of his career.
  • A conversation about how we as drummers are kinda sounding the same.
  • Certain drummers we are both digging…JD Beck, Daru Jones, Chris Dave, Yussef Dayes.
  • Ash’s take on ‘Dilla Beats’.
  • Ash’s reading and why he left The Voice.
  • How intense performing film scores are.
  • Comfort levels and the Windmill Studio.

 

Why Should You Listen?

Ash is one of the most popular drummers on the planet right now and there aren’t many appearances of Ash on podcasts currently. To get a little deeper, however, this interview has some controversy in it that is really interesting. Did I mention that this was recorded first thing in the morning in the LA sun on an eleventh storey hotel balcony too? That certainly didn’t hurt. Overall, we had a lot of laughs, it was laid back and it was real. Are you listening to it yet?

 

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Feb 9, 2020

“I believed in myself and I knew I could fight past it. I knew I could find a way.”

Mike Sleath is one of Canada’s most in-demand drummers who is performing all over the world with Shawn Mendes. Originally from Toronto, Canada, Mike, like most of us, spent his first few years playing for $200 per night. And yes, he had to share that $200 with the band. After being rejected from Humber College three times he had a heart to heart with his mom one day and the conversation was along the lines of, “well you can keep music in your life but maybe it is time to find a job.” 

Even considering the constant rejection he continued to apply himself the best he could and he wasn’t going to back down. Mike is a determined musician who is pushing himself with practice, bringing hybrid drum sets to the next level, touring non-stop, and keeping himself in good health and a healthy state of mind. Mike Sleath is proof that when the universe is signaling you to give up, respond with a good strategy and try again, harder.

Mike endorses DW Drums, Remo, Los Cabos, Sabian, Drum Dots, LP, Big Fat Snare Drum, Roland, Stone Thrones Drum Seat Covers.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Details about the recent Shawn Mendes tour.
  • Mike’s earliest days with the drums and his Uncle’s Ludwig drums.
  • Mike’s crazy hybrid kit for Mendes gigs and the steep learning curve to learn that setup.
  • Some tips for playing big stadiums and large rooms.
  • How much Mike is playing below his technical abilities for a pop gig.
  • How Mike finds a routine for drum practice during his tour life.
  • We hear Mike’s story of how he worked past being rejected three times from Humber College.
  • Are your social skills more important than your drumming skills?
  • How we can get bored with “our sound” but to continue working toward your strengths as a musician.

 

Why Should You Listen?

For starters, this episode is FUN! Mike is a total bro and we had the best time hanging out and discussing his career and thoughts. A lot of interesting points came up that I think will inspire drummers to work hard and not beat themselves up over rejection. Mike could have easily thrown in the towel and said to himself that drumming professionally wasn’t meant for him to do as a career. A saying that I really love is, “nothing good is easy, and nothing easy is good.” I think this applies directly to Mike’s career and I really respect him for sticking with it and making something great happen.

 

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Feb 2, 2020

“If you want something, you can make it. You don’t have to wait to have someone else do it for you.”

Heather Thomas is a straight-up badass. She is a great drummer, singer, educator and most importantly, person. We met up at NAMM to shoot an interview and where this one went was incredible. She has been performing and teaching out of Seattle for many years but for 2020 she has decided to take on a big adventure. She plans to visit a major music city each month until she returns to Seattle in December.

Heather has big dreams. She told me off-air that her dream is to play drums on the moon and to be the first to do it. Her personality is simply wonderful. She is a fearless woman in pursuit of a life filled with adventure, experiences and growth.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Why Heather decided to sell all her stuff and begin her 2020 with a year long adventure to evolve.
  • How she created her own version of Patreon for herself.
  • Heather’s incredible insight to what holds people back from pursuing the best life possible.
  • Our thoughts on the void inside of us and how filling the void with “stuff” just doesn’t fix that.
  • How Heather uses fear as a signal to move towards her personal growth.
  • Having realistic expectations when you first begin learning something new.
  • The impact negative inner commentary has on your growth.

 

Why Should You Listen?

We all have moments in our lives where we become fearful and uncertain of how to proceed. In these situations, we can have a strong pull towards the easiest solution or one that has the least resistance. But what is the best decision to make? A lot of the time, I feel that the harder decision is the best one to make.

With so many conversations with friends, acquaintances and of course the many artists I have interviewed, I get the sense that those who push the hardest for growth yield a better life. It saddens me to think that people aren’t believing in themselves enough. Or that people are cluttering their lives with a mess of stuff that conceals their fullest life. We can all benefit from looking deep within ourselves to find the thing that excites us to work hard and desire something truly fulfilling.

In this episode, we take a deep dive into this subject matter. It comes across in a confident and empowering way that has clarity. It sounds so simple but it isn’t. The concept in and of itself isn’t complicated but taking the time to explore the unknown, face our fears, and realize that we all should be accepting of great things for ourselves is a lifetime of work. We should all consider putting our negative commentary in time out and search for our best life.



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Jan 26, 2020

“With us it’s more like family. It’s like, “This is what I got. I’m with you guys through thick and thin”

Christopher Guanlao is the drummer for the American alternative band, Silversun Pickups (SSPU). Chris began playing with the band nearly four years before they released their first album titled ‘Carnavas’. That places Chris’ tenure at eighteen years at the time of this recording. The band rose to popularity when their song “Lazy Eye’ became featured on both Rock Band 2 and Rock Band World Tour. Since the release of Carnavas, Silversun Pickups have released four studio records over the next fourteen years including their 2019 release, Widow’s Weeds

What makes Chris incredibly unique is his self-taught, bombastic, open-handed play style. He also has a head turning drum kit setup that would make you wonder if he was one of the first members of the “high cymbal gang”. He plays a beautiful purple C&C acrylic kit, with a ride, crash and hats down low on his left. And then one impossibly high standing crash cymbal on his right. This asymmetrical setup has grown into his style and it is something instantly memorable.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • How Silversun Pickups has lasted for roughly two decades and is still going strong.
  • Rupture and repair.
  • Chris’ thoughts on the common “band” template these days.
  • How we can create great moments during performances when things go wrong.
  • Chris’ thoughts on why musicians crave to play regardless of the risks or costs involved.
  • The recording process on Widow’s Weeds, SSPU’s newest record.
  • A fan email read and discussed at the end of the episode.

 

Why Should You Listen?

A great deal of these interviews feature guests who are “drummer’s drummers” who have reached some kind of profound ability and understanding of their instrument and therefore end up working with many different artists and mediums. Far less of them are with drummers who play for a popular rock band only. So, with that being said this interview gives off a very relatable message to drummers who are dedicated to one group. 

To play with one group and essentially not work with other musicians on the side is almost unheard of, as many know. And with that fact in mind, SSPU is reaching two decades of playing together. Consider this -- Fifty percent of marriages fail. I wonder what that number jumps to for bands with no member changes over five years? 

Really the big takeaway here is this. Bands can get really messy sometimes and sometimes great bands are not meant to last. I think it is a different dynamic altogether than the lone ranger who only represents themself. Just do a great job consistently with the smallest negative footprint possible during the process. If you can do that there is a chance that things will work out. But what about a band? You can end up with a great performer, great songwriter and wonderful social butterfly who is a total wild card professionally. How do you deal with that person if the band is doing well on the front stage and poorly on the back stage? It is an interesting topic that I want to explore more with drummers in the future. 

 

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Jan 19, 2020

“I should actually have a bed down here. That’s how much time I spend down here.”

Raghav Mehrotra is a fifteen year old drummer, bassist and guitarist. He even provided vocals in addition to drums for the Broadway Musical, “School of Rock” for roughly four years. Did I mention he was fifteen? Raghav has been making waves for the past few years due to his incredible talent. As Raghav mentions in this interview, it didn’t come naturally though. It was a product of as much hard work. Yes folks, that’s right. You can’t get around it and neither could Raghav. Hard work is the only answer to get to the levels of performance Raghav demonstrates. 

The future is bright for Raghav. Even if he were to decide that a professional career in music isn’t for him, I would argue that his hard work ethic will follow him in any field as long as he is passionate about it. He has accomplished so much already and yet there is so much time to continue pushing forward. It will be exciting to witness his success in years to come.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Whether Raghav ever feels the pressure of expectation from fans due to his growth and abilities currently.
  • Raghav’s overview of how he discovered music as his passion in life including the story of how he landed a role in the Broadway Musical, “School of Rock”.
  • How Raghav dealt with the uncomfortable experience of singing in a Broadway Musical.
  • Our thoughts concerning social media “elevator pitches” within drumming videos.
  • Where the “seed” and perhaps innate interest in music comes from for Raghav and whether we need to pace ourselves within our passions to not risk burning them out.
  • The importance of investing time and energy into things that present delayed rewards.
  • Why we as artists need to adapt with technology but balance our usage at the same time.
  • Whether Raghav believes natural talent exists.
  • Is technology interfering with the prospect of kids becoming interested in music and learning an instrument?
  • Raghav’s perspective on how much drumming and music provide him with a healthy sense of self.
  • Whether or not “Sex, Drugs, and Rock & Roll” still part of the image of a musician?

 

Why Should You Listen?

Raghav is simply an incredibly impressive young man. At fifteen years old, it is almost impossible to assume that Raghav wouldn’t be a successful person. To hear the wise advice from such a young person makes us older folks feel pretty happy. We tackle a lot of important topics in this interview. Some of it applies to all ages and other stuff is very much concerning our youth. I believe Raghav is an exemplary individual who can potentially inspire thousands of people to become the best they can be and this interview highlights that wonderfully.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTKvUwDAXmc

 

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Jan 12, 2020

“From that point on there was reason behind every note I played.” - Brandon reflecting on his first drum lesson with Jared Falk. 

Brandon Toews is the product director at Drumeo, author of two drumming books (The Best Beginner Drum Book and The Drummer’s Toolbox), drummer, and educator. At 22, he has managed to achieve quite an impressive resume within the industry. Recently Brandon has also become an endorsed artist with Evans Drumheads, Istanbul Agop Cymbals and Vic Firth Drumsticks. In this interview we explore playing with intention, balancing heavy work loads, and a first lesson with Jared that always stuck with Brandon.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • A brief conversation about drum kit setups.
  • A quick overview of Brandon’s career going back six years to the present.
  • A valuable lesson learned during Brandon’s first drum lesson with Jared.
  • Whether or not drummers are disciplined enough to stick with focused practice.
  • Our thoughts about gigs that excite us vs the ones that don’t as much but still need to exist for us to pay our bills.
  • How Brandon managed to write two drum books in a year and a half while attending school.

 

Why Should You Listen?

There is general drum nerdery in this episode that will be fun for listeners but our conversation also explores some topics that hold a great deal of relevance for all drummers. For any drummers who solely earn their livelihood through drumming may get a kick out of our conversation about the gigs that we may sometimes feel take up too much of our gigging schedule. Imagine this; The audience is eating dinner, having conversations and your job is to provide a gentle and appropriate ambience for their dinner. The sound guy says, “you are too loud. Please play quieter”. This kind of remark can easily diminish the fun factor of what we might be fantasizing about. And that fantasy might be going all out with no volume or creative restrictions in sight with a totally engaged audience and whistling and some positive outbursts. We all love that scenario don’t we?

We also talk about the importance of playing with intention. Really considering the notes and grooves that we choose to provide something appropriate and tasteful to a band setting. It is easy to get caught up with the flashy “drummy” stuff and while there is a time and place for that, we need to keep that to a minimum when we know it doesn’t belong.

These points mentioned are definitely the big takeaways from this episode and it is interesting to hear Brandon’s perspective on this.

 

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Jan 5, 2020

Out of 12 to 14 students each year; I don’t know if there was one real committed drummer.

Dorothea Taylor has been drumming for 55 years. That is longer than most of you reading this have been alive. She got her start in a local drum and bugle corps in the small northern Michigan town she grew up in. Her stories of practicing with her friends from the corps out in fields is somewhat cinematic and romantic. She has very positive associations with drumming in her life.

Since her time in the corps, Dorothea became a drum instructor and has performed as well. She has a deep knowledge of rudiments and patterns and showcases tremendous technical skills. The first time I watched Dorothea on Instagram I was honestly surprised, and then a couple seconds later once that wore off, I was quite impressed with what I was seeing. Apparently Drumeo was as well because they invited her to the studio to record some lessons very recently. You can watch her play-along video to Disturbed “Down With The Sickness” which had gained over 1 million views in TWO DAYS!!

Dorothea Taylor has a great deal of experience in education and her own personal time with learning all she can about drumming. Her insights towards the future of drumming and how challenging it is becoming to gain the attention of young students is a spot of trouble for Dorothea. We took a deep dive into that….

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Dorothea’s early years in the drum and bugle corps.
  • Whether Dorothea ever experienced any social issues at that time for being a female drummer.
  • Her deep concerns towards screens and distractions with developing youths. 
  • What were kids like to teach twenty years ago compared to today.
  • An old story about Tony Royster Jr.
  • Dorthea’s visit at Drumeo and the egg challenge.

 

Why Should You Listen?

Most people who listen to this podcast know that I am very passionate about the prospect of raising a healthy minded child. I think and read a lot about child psychology and what is healthy for kids’ development and what is not healthy. Screens and technology is a concern for so many people but at the same time we can’t get enough of them.

I think screen time isn’t all bad. It just needs to be monitored and taken in small doses very few times per day. Dorothea might agree with that too. Distractions make it difficult to fully commit and immerse yourself into an activity. Kids are more impressionable than adults and we as adults need to assume a responsible role with screen time. 

How this comes back around to drumming is this. Too many distractions and not enough balanced structure is going to hurt the future of young up and coming drummers, I think. In this conversation both through opinion and experience, we discuss how technology may be preventing a fuller experience for young drummers or kids just beginning. I guess we could actually just say EVERYBODY can’t we? I think the stuff we bring up will cause many listeners to think about the fusion of technology and drumming and how to leverage the strengths and manage ourselves with the negative side.

 

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Dec 29, 2019

“I’m doing it because I want to and it’s right for me to do.”

David Raouf, AKA RDavidR, is a drummer and YouTube content creator who explores the possibilities of repurposing drum equipment of all kinds to create new items for your drum set. David has also made a lot of collaboration videos with such drummers as Stephen Taylor, David Cola, Juan Carlito Mendoza, 80/20 Drummer and Drum Beats Online. I highly recommend that you check out
David’s YouTube channel here for drum hacks, repurposing, experiments and other fun creative projects that you may want to try.

David was recently filming lessons at Drumeo and also collaborated with them to create a series of videos on easy DIY projects that almost anyone can do with some simple tools and a bit of know how that David shares. To expand on his Drumeo content, David and I had a chat about his journey creating his channel, the realities of creating a YouTube channel and whether or not he has received any outraged emails from drum product companies regarding his DIY approach.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • How David began his YouTube channel and how it evolved.
  • David and I discussing our thoughts on rushing into post-secondary school.
  • Whether earning money from content creating is the reason to start doing it. 
  • What David has learned and benefited from by creating content for YouTube.
  • Why being creative only works well when you feel inspired to create.
  • David’s feedback from companies who make products that can be created by David’s methods.
  • David’s experience at Drumeo.

 

Why Should You Listen?

There are a lot of people who have the desire to create content online. I have personally received a lot of messages over the last three years from people who see this podcast and then decide that they also want to create some kind of media for the internet. More often than not though it seems like people look at it as a potential source of income. It isn’t to say that it wouldn’t potentially be that but it will take a long time before content creating adds any income to your bank account. This is really about spending your time doing something different. Substitute less productive activities for creative activities. 

Given the fact that David’s YouTube channel has been around for years and is performing quite well and he still holds a day job should be enough proof that it is something he enjoys doing but doesn’t expect it to pay his bills.

 

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Dec 22, 2019

“If he can start over, I can start over” 

William F. Ludwig III is the last living Ludwig making drums in the industry. Ludwig is a name that drummers will certainly recognize and some non-drummers may have an understanding of it too. The Ludwig name is made up of rich history, innovation, and passion with many twists and turns along the way. 

When Bill was 59 he decided that he should get back into the drum industry and follow the footsteps of his grandfather. Bill’s grandfather had started WFL drums after leaving Ludwig drum company, which was bought by Conn. He had decided that he wanted to create, for the second time, a company that focused on quality products and great customer service to match. A company that wasn’t as focused on the corporate mentality. He very cleverly indicated below the WFL badge that these were, in fact, a Ludwig product and this helped gain the trust of new customers. Bill’s grandfather would eventually buy back the Ludwig name after a very successful run under the WFL name.

It was Bill’s grandfather’s decision to start over by creating WFL that inspired Bill Ludwig III to create WFLIII drum company. Bill had a strong urge to get back into the drumming industry after a long hiatus. As evidence would suggest, Bill made a great decision starting WFLIII because everything is falling into place perfectly as if it was meant to happen. 

 

You Will Hear About….

  • The humble beginnings of Ludwig which includes information about the silent film era instruments.
  • The start of WFL drums leading to the buyback of the Ludwig name.
  • Ringo Starr and the Beatles’ influence on drum sales for Ludwig.
  • Bill Ludwig III beginnings and future roles at Ludwig.
  • Why Bill Ludwig III created WFLIII drum company.
  • WFLIII drum company’s growth, strengths as a company, and future.

 

Why Should You Listen?

You will understand the entire history of Ludwig drum company by listening to this episode and it is told by an actual Ludwig! The history told by Bill sets up the second half nicely to bring context as to why the WFLIII drums may be appealing to drummers. Not only is it an actual Ludwig heavily involved but I also felt a sense of family and warmth to this company. For example; when you call WFLIII, you get Bill. Also, the drums are based on old shell recipes developed by Bill’s grandfather many years ago that are tried and true. Nothing flashy. Just stuff that works.

One of Bill’s biggest obstacles is to educate drummers on what WFLIII is and what the Ludwig story is really about. This is such an important feature of these drums. For drummers who have a strong liking to the history and spirit of Ludwig, you may feel a pull towards WFLIII once you realize the degree of passion and love that Bill has for this company and the William Ludwigs before him. You may feel like the spirit of Ludwig lives in WFLIII.

 

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Dec 15, 2019

“It was a moment of achievement that I have never felt before.” 

Jeremy Schulz is a repeat guest on this podcast. He is an instructor for his own virtual teaching practice called Beats From The Core. His main focus with this is to empower people through the power of drumming and music. Jeremy has battled Tourette’s Syndrome through learning the instrument many years ago when he was a teen. He noticed that by learning how to communicate through the drums it calmed his stuttering. We discussed all of this in our first interview over a year ago.

However, today we are talking about his walk across America to raise awareness against bullying. Jeremy decided to align with the “Fight for the Forgotten” foundation that was created by MMA Heavyweight fighter, Justin Wren. Jeremy decided to walk from the Brooklyn Bridge to the Sundial Bridge in Redding, CA. His walk would be just over 3000 miles and would take nearly six months to complete. His walk was completely unassisted and in this interview we hear about the difficulties he faced, his experience with people along the way, and how this walk helped define himself and his purpose.

This episode consists of three interviews. The first interview is a short ten minute chat on the day that he left the Brooklyn Bridge. The second interview took place in Arkansas and finally the third part was recorded roughly one month after he completed his walk in California.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Why Jeremy decided to walk across America.
  • Our inner commentary and how to grow through difficult situations.
  • The dichotomy between people’s behaviour towards others online versus in person.
  • Stories about Jeremy’s mishaps and close encounters with possibly life-threatening situations.
  • What Jeremy learned from his walk.
  • How Jeremy is adjusting to regular life again after the walk.
  • The feelings Jeremy had when he walked upon the Sundial Bridge.

 

Why Should You Listen?

This episode really focuses on Jeremy’s journey and the inner growth experienced by taking on such a massive challenge. It is very conversational with respect to Jeremy’s observations about the people he met and how people do in fact come together and unite when they witness someone with a strong will to do good. I would also say that this episode proves that by taking a leap of faith we grow as a result. 

 

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Dec 8, 2019

“I had a laser focus in what I wanted to pursue in terms of being a professional musician.”

Jim Riley has been in Nashville, TN for quite some time now and has enjoyed a very balanced and successful career in music. He is the drummer and musical director for the very famous pop country act, Rascal Flatts, a drum teacher for his home studio called “The Drum Dojo”, a clinician and has appeared on Drumeo more than once as well. During the years between 2011 - 2015 and 2017 Jim had been voted “Best Country Drummer” by the readers of Modern Drummer Magazine and he also won the distinction of “Best Drum Clinician” in 2009. Jim has also authored two drum education books, “Survival Guide for the Modern Drummer” and “Song Charting Made Easy”. A third book is expected to be released very soon.

Jim has enjoyed a very full career and seems to have found a firm seat at the table of Nashville drummers. He moved to Nashville in 1997 and for the first couple of years Jim’s experiences were touch and go. Early on, he had worked in a drum shop and in fact slept there during the nights on soft drum cases. After that business closed its doors, Jim found himself sleeping in his truck with his dog for a couple of weeks. (Click this link to read more about this story at Drumeo “The Beat”) However, Jim never doubted that the path he had chosen was indeed the best decision for him in the long-run. Jim’s luck began to turn around when he would eventually become roommates with Rich Redmond.

Jim had secured a good gig with Mark Chesnutt and everything was going well. On the side he was playing $40 gigs with the guys, who would eventually become Rascal Flatts, and also performed regularly with Hank Williams III. One day, Jay Demarcus said to Jim that if their new project, Rascal Flatts, ever got a record deal they would love to have him as their drummer. And well, we all know how that turned out. A big risk turned into a big reward. Jim never gave up on his dream and it turned into a reality.  

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Jim’s talks about a lecture that he gave at his old high school, Natick High School
  • Jim’s assured confidence that his future was in music
  • The story about Larrie Londin
  • What Nashville is actually like as a music city and advice on approaching it if you just moved there hoping to create a career for yourself
  • The Nashville number system
  • Jim’s story about when he first moved to Nashville and how he eventually got the gig with Rascal Flatts
  • Jim’s advice for musicians who haven’t yet hit their target and definition of success
  • Jim’s new book releasing soon “Improvisational Tools for the Modern Drummer”

 

Why Should You Listen?

Jim Riley is living proof that if you want something badly, you can achieve it through hard work and perseverance. Sometimes it is nice to be reminded that the success we desire is obtainable with enough effort put forward. That is a big message behind this episode.

You will also have a great explanation of the Nashville number system if you have ever been confused by other explanations or haven’t yet heard of what that is about. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMIQG9heAXg

 

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Dec 1, 2019

“Well, I don’t wanna sound like that guy but I am the happiest I’ve ever been in my life!”

Gregg Bissonette has enjoyed an amazing career in music. The Detroit native has had the pleasure of playing with such artists as David Lee Roth, Ringo Starr, Maynard Ferguson, Carlos Santana, Don Henley, his brother Matt and many others. As you can probably tell based on those names alone, Gregg is incredibly versatile musically. Beyond that though, Gregg is also known for being down to earth, professional, comical, and friendly. All of these attributes have certainly helped him in sustaining his life in music.

Gregg proudly endorses Dixon Drums, Sabian Cymbals, Vic Firth drumsticks, Remo Drumheads, DW Drum pedals, Samson Audio, LP Percussion, Audix Mics, Gregg Bissonette signature stick bag by Kaces, XL Specialty road cases, Beato drum bags, LT lug locks.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Gregg’s experience recording lessons at Drumeo
  • Some advice he received from his parents at a young age
  • Why we need to love and accept everybody
  • Gregg’s experiences with being a dad
  • Gregg and Matt’s first band together “Today’s People” and how beneficial and enjoyable it has been for them to perform music together over the years
  • Gregg talks about his state of happiness and the importance of being positive
  • Who is Skippy Skuffleton?
  • How Gregg got into voice over work
  • Gregg shares some priceless advice for working drummers

 

Why Should You Listen?

Gregg’s name has come up before in DrumeoGab interviews and it always seems to come back to the same overall message. Besides the fact that Gregg is a great guy, it boils down to his great experiential advice that he provides the pros with. When he speaks, you listen. So, with that being said we have an hour of that here. It’s great fundamental wisdom that you can’t go wrong with.

From the importance of being positive, grateful, professional, able, down to earth, helpful and versatile. It is all here. There is a particularly strong message in there where he talks about other people who can try to rob you of your happiness and why we should just stay in our lane and keep working on being the best version of ourselves. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfabTGZjCEQ

 

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Nov 24, 2019

“You just keep working and you have short-term goals. For me, it was a very slow up-hill climb.”

Glen Sobel, an L.A. born and raised drummer, is a familiar name within the industry. He has held the gig with Alice Cooper for over eight years and has also been working with Hollywood Vampires, featuring Alice, Joe Perry, and Johnny Depp! That is quite a heavy list of names, isn’t it? Beyond that, he has also toured with Chris Impellitteri, Jennifer Batten (Michael Jackson's guitarist), Tony Macalpine, Gary Hoey, Warner Bros recording act Beautiful Creatures (Ozzfest tour), Cypress Hill and many others.

Glen has a reputation as being a quick study. He can learn a whole set of live material in a day or track an entire album worth of material on very short notice. He has a method of creating a cheat sheet that has helped him achieve such remarkable results and maintain his successful career over many years. Two examples of where he was thrown in the fire were when he subbed for Vasco Rossi’s Matt Laug and also Tommy Lee of Motley Crue. Both of these gigs were sudden and forced him to learn and execute material quickly.

I was excited to speak to Glen because of his pistol hot reputation as a hired gun. It is a fiercely competitive career and Glen has proven his worth over and over again. I thought that having Glen speak about his expertise on the podcast would bring a lot of value to anyone who either is already slugging it out in this role or those who are just beginning their journey. There is a lot of useful and promising advice in this episode for our community.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Glen talks about his first band ever, Bourbon Street.
  • Us talking about how deep interest and passion in something can lead to success over time.
  • CBG’s (Character Building Gigs).
  • When is it time to move on or stay on board to see if what you envision becomes reality.
  • The advice and mentorship that Gregg Bissonette has provided Glen with.
  • How Glen prepared and executed some major sub in gigs. We’re talking about Matt Laug and Tommy Lee.
  • Glen’s neck injury several years ago and what he does now to preserve himself and also future proof his career.
  • If Glen couldn’t play drums anymore, what else would he do?
  • How real is the rock n’ roll image? Is it just an image?
  • Are there too many samples in modern rock music?
  • Are typical bar gigs for 50 people better or worse than playing sold out arenas with Alice Cooper?

 

Why Should You Listen?

To have a lengthy conversation with one of rock music’s finest hired guns in the business is a rare opportunity. I felt it was paramount to have him share his first-hand experiences being a hired gun. It is so that all of you can both have a better vantage point to the real side of this industry. You could get caught up with dreams and visions of a life better than your own and maybe something like what Glen does is the answer; in your mind.  

I wanted to both demystify this fantasy and also provide helpful tips for working drummers told through the vast experiences that Glen has had. I think that we managed to create a fine episode that will serve listeners on a very practical level.

 

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Nov 17, 2019

“When I got there I definitely had to compose myself.”

Pat Petrillo is a world-class drummer and educator from New Jersey who has been featured many times on Drumeo live and pre-recorded lessons, satellite instruction, and development of the P4 practice pad. Besides his vast library of lessons with Drumeo, Pat is one of the pioneers of educational media content. His very first video, “Snare Drum Rudiments” was, in fact, one of the first instructional videos ever produced. He would later create his DVD/Book, “Hands, Grooves, and Fills”.

In addition to his vast contributions to drum education, he is also an incredibly versatile performer who is capable of blending into nearly any situation with authenticity. He has performed with Gloria Gaynor, Patti LaBelle, Dee-Lite, Patti Smythe, and Glen Burtnik. He also has performed many times on Broadway in New York City including such shows as “A Chorus Line”, “Grease”, “Footloose” and “Dreamgirls”.

I was first introduced to Pat at NAMM this year (2019) and we had discussed the idea of having an interview. We decided to wait because Pat had a very special project in the works. He was recording an album with his NYC Big Rhythm Band covering a cherry-picked selection of Beatles tunes. The drums were recorded at the legendary Abbey Road studios exactly where Ringo would have tracked drums many years ago. So Pat and I got together to talk about this experience.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • The album cover of Abbey Road and the coincidence that took place for Pat’s album cover.
  • Pat’s initial reaction to being at Abbey Road studios.
  • Details about the recording process at Abbey Road studios.
  • Pat reflecting on his love for The Beatles music and how this project means so much to him.
  • Pat’s thoughts on how musicians are undervalued by consumers of music.
  • How drum videos online can end up having no value other than to impress others and gain notoriety among other drummers.
  • Whether Pat would trade places with a young drummer in this generation in favor of his generation and upbringing.
  • How do we maintain intensity without the intensity of volume?
  • Being a responsible musician and not an irresponsible drummer on the bandstand.

 

Why Should You Listen?

Given the fact that Pat is an educator, it becomes almost unavoidable that he will educate people during an interview. Not necessarily “how to” stuff but instead a “why you should” approach, or “why you shouldn’t” for that matter. There is a lot of that stuff in here. It is also really inspiring to hear about his travels to Abbey Road and those days spent in a studio that Pat would only have dreamt about recording in as a child.


Music used in this episode:

Pat Petrillo NYC Big Rhythm Band - The Abbey Road Sessions

Magical Mystery Tour

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLRKons5zzo

 

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Nov 10, 2019

"My favourite playing that I’ve ever done is when I’m in this space of no-mind."

Eric Slick is an accomplished musician from Philadelphia who is a multi-instrumentalist and songwriter. He is the drummer for the band Dr. Dog and his past credentials include, The Adrian Belew Power Trio, Ween, and Natalie Prass. Besides playing drums for Dr. Dog, Eric also has his own solo project, aptly named Eric Slick, and his punk band Lithuania.

Eric discovered his sense of creativity at a very young age. He and his sister, Julie, would write songs about low budget movie posters and perform these songs for their parents in the living room. To aid this outlet, Eric’s father taught Eric and Julie how to overdub recordings with two boomboxes daisy-chained together. From what I gather, the Slick household was a creative one.

At the age of eleven, Eric discovered Paul Green at the Griffin Cafe. Paul is the creator of the now-famous School of Rock. Throughout Eric’s pre-teen/teen years, he would play drums at the School of Rock, while Julie joined later to play bass. At the School of Rock, they learned a broad range of music ranging from Pink Floyd to Frank Zappa. Towards the end of Eric and Julie's time spent at the School of Rock, Paul had suggested to Adrian Belew that Eric and Julie were his best students and thus Adrien hired them to play in his trio.

Eric has had many twists and turns throughout his professional career. He is a vastly deep musician with the desire to explore his creativity to the fullest degree. Releasing solo works “Palisades” and “Bullfighter” it is clear that Eric is not limited to simply one musical role and that his artistry beckons for more. In this interview, we explore many of Eric’s philosophies, stories, and personal growth throughout his life.


You Will Hear About….

  • Eric’s introduction to the School of Rock.
  • Why he left the Adrien Belew Power Trio.
  • How Eric wrote Palisades and why he left Philly.
  • Eric’s experiences with his dream therapist.
  • Eric’s interpretation on my dream.
  • Overcoming panic attacks and how they affected him.
  • Why to go with the flow of life.


Why Should You Listen?

If you are a fan of Eric Slick and Dr. Dog then you will find this to be interesting because of the depth that we go into. If you have never heard of Eric before, you will likely still find this to be an enjoyable podcast episode and may hear echoes of previous episodes in it.

There is a common theme lately with the podcast. That is we need to let go of our egos and expectations. We need to go with the flow of life instead of man-handling it into what we think we want it to be. Stop overthinking. Be present with what you are currently doing. Be kinder to yourself.

The big picture of what we are here to do is such an important and valid topic. This episode continues to explore these concepts and shed more light on this vast subject.


Music used in this episode:

Eric Slick - Out Of Habit

Release

Broken Down Volvo

Eric Slick - Palisades

Evergreen


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Nov 3, 2019

"It doesn’t matter where you are. It doesn’t matter who you are playing with. Stand out and be the best you can be."

Brian Tichy is an incredible drummer who stands out in the hard-rock and classic rock genres. Most notably he has performed with Whitesnake, Billy Idol, Ozzy Osbourne, Sass Jordan, Foreigner, Dead Daisies and many others. His projects include the brand new Silverthorne and past project with Sass Jordan, S.U.N. Besides his work as a musician, he also took on the role of organizing Bonzo Bash. This is a party event that he came up with years ago where he and other drummers pay tribute to John Bonham by performing Led Zeppelin tunes. This event has brought quite a buzz along with it over the years where some famous drummers, including one of Tichy’s biggest influences, Peter Criss, came out to partake in the fun.

Brian has also appeared on Drumeo where he breaks down some of the most famous Bonham grooves, tasty triplet licks for rock drumming and more! There is a link below to check out five essential Bonham licks! Brian is a human encyclopedia for classic rock music and specifically Led Zeppelin. Very few can come as close as Brian to sounding like the greatest rock drummer of all time, IMO.


You Will Hear About….

  • Brian breaks down twelve different famous guitar riffs.
  • Is Brian doing Bonzo Bash again in January? Brian also explains all of what goes into creating an event like that.
  • The distinct differences between the side-man role versus bandleader/event organizer.
  • Brian’s new band Silverthorne and what their action plan is to bring this band to the public.
  • Brian’s thoughts on click-tracks in the studio, quantizing drum parts, autotune and why he thinks the industry went in this direction.


Why Should You Listen?

A lot of DrumeoGab episodes go deep and often have a heavy tone within the conversations. This episode with Brian Tichy has a lighter vibe and gets into our mutual love for classic rock and the good old days of what was considered pop music. Along with that conversation comes Brian’s thoughts on the current state of audio recording in popular music and essentially how the human component is being removed little by little.

There is also some great insight into what goes into planning events or running a band. So for anyone out there who is wishing to walk the more entrepreneurial path of the music industry, there may be some very helpful insights within this episode for you.


Music used in this episode:

Silverthorne - Tear the Sky Wide Open

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1aEz6B7wRfA&t=109s

 

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Oct 27, 2019

“All the decisions you make have brought you to where you are at this point in your life. You have to live with that.”

Ryan Van Poederooyen is a drummer, public speaker, and drum instructor from Vancouver, Canada. Ryan is best known as the drummer of the former bands Devin Townsend Band and later the Devin Townsend Project. Ryan essentially took over the reins of the drum throne from the legendary drummer Gene Hoglan, who played with Devin in Strapping Young Lad. Since then, Ryan has recruited a supergroup of musicians to create Imonolith. Ryan expects that their debut release will become available in 2020.

Besides drumming, Ryan is a huge advocate of motivating human beings. He has an incredibly strong message that empowers people to rise to their greatness. He has a very unapologetic and realistic take on how our decision making leads us to our current reality. Ryan also promotes goal setting, physical and mental health, doubling down on your dreams and above all, working hard.

I believe that this conversation with Ryan will speak loudly to listeners. This is an incredibly powerful interview that reminds us all that we all have one chance in life to make something happen. We need to set ourselves up for success in activities and career paths that can enrich our lives and help us become better people. Don’t sleep on this one!

You Will Hear About….

  • Our first experiences with Sonor drums
  • Ryan’s dog Frodo and a funny story about Dave Atkinson’s dog Guinness.
  • Ryan’s new band Imonolith.
  • How we can live with our decisions.
  • Can we invest in maybes?
  • Ryan’s goal setting formula called “The Four-Fives”

 

Why Should You Listen?

This episode has so much value in it I can’t even begin to explain. You could spend hundreds of dollars to get this type of information from a person like Ryan. Would you ask the right questions to get the right answers? You can leave that to me. This conversation goes so far beyond drumming. This is about our lives and how to make the most of it.

Music used in this episode:

The Devin Townsend Project - UNIVERSE IN A BALL!

Imonolith - Hollow

 

CLICK HERE TO CLAIM YOUR GIFT FROM RYAN! 

9 Steps to Living a Life of Purpose

 

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Oct 20, 2019

“When somebody good, or something good comes around the world doesn’t trust it and they destroy what they don’t understand.”

Jonathan “Sugarfoot” Moffett is one of the most important drumming figures in pop music. He has had an unbelievable career with even more unbelievable beginnings. Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Jonathan began playing drums as a child. He and his two older brothers all played in a band together for a few years until eventually Jonathan was fired because he couldn’t get into the nightclubs to play that his brothers wanted to perform in. This disenchanted Jonathan a great deal but would prove that this was just the beginning of an incredible life of music.

His whole story is something divine or something we might read in a fairy tale. He was in association with Michael Jackson up until the time of Michael’s death in 2009. Jonathan was with Michael on the last night that he was alive on this earth. It was a thirty-year working relationship and brotherly friendship and I am almost certain that we will never hear of something like that happening again.

Jonathan has also performed with Madonna, Sir Elton John, Quincy Jones, Stevie Wonder, and many others. His resume is something of epic proportions and he shares so much wisdom in this episode that helps us understand why that may have been.

You Will Hear About….

  • How Jonathan got his name “Sugarfoot”.
  • How Jonathan got the Jackson gig.
  • Jonathan’s beliefs on what is intended for us.
  • The multiplicity effect drumming has on our brains.
  • Michael Jackson’s compassion for all life.
  • How Jonathan feels since Michael’s passing.
  • Jonathan’s thoughts and feelings towards the allegations and controversy surrounding Michael Jackson.

 

Why Should You Listen?

This episode contains things that are incredibly inspiring and also educational, which makes it a great episode. It also contains a lot of great stories from the legendary career that Jonathan has experienced so far. However, what Jonathan has to say regarding Michael’s passing and the allegations and controversy makes this episode important. I have read and heard numerous interviews with Jonathan and no one goes there with Jonathan. It is some incredibly strong subject matter and difficult to ask as a host. But we went there.

I must say though, given the amount of time Jonathan spent with Michael, he is a very credible person to speak about this stuff. He is both neutral and knowledgeable about what Michael was really like as a person. I believe that anyone who hears this episode will have a sense of confirmation that Michael was a better human being than most of us can fathom.


Music used in this episode:

Michael Jackson - Thriller

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRGTT4Y6LnA

 

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Oct 13, 2019

“The artistic thing needs to happen. Along with being great parents we just can’t live any other way. I can’t live any other way.”

Dan Weiss is a musician from Brooklyn, NYC who is a drummer, tabla player, and composer. He leads his projects Starebaby, his jazz trio, Fourth Floor, and collaborations with Ari Hoenig and Miles Okazaki.

As well as being a sideman in very high demand, he is also a bandleader and composer. He composes through piano, electric bass, and drum set to create these incredibly moody, complex, rich and compelling works that have a distinct presence to them.

Dan also studies tabla with Samir Chatterjee. This study with Samir has been going on for over twenty years. 

In this interview, you will hear Dan’s complete and total honesty. Dan provided an analysis based on his answers in this interview. The results were,

Honesty = 98.9%

Answers on the whole = 87.3%


You Will Hear About….

  • Dan’s creative process with composing and some details on the new Starebaby record.
  • Dan’s discusses the book You Are Not Your Brain and how he has benefited from this book.
  • How Dan's Guru, Samir Chatterjee, teaches him by example.
  • How Dan adapted to being a father and what he has learned from his daughter.
  • If Dan ever thinks about the future state of the world.
  • If we as adults lose the child-like "specialness" of life.
  • Practicing in your mind vs on the drums.


Why Should You Listen?

I am usually very satisfied with these podcast episodes that I create. But sometimes when they are finished, I have an incredible feeling of connectivity to the work. It is remarkable how much Dan and I related to each other in this one. There was a great sense of honesty, openness and human rawness in this conversation.

Dan and I cover a lot of deep topics that apply directly to the artist’s mind and heart. How do we know when our work is done or if it is any good? How do we obsess over detail, without it suffocating us in the process? These are some of the questions raised in this one. I recommend listening deeply and focused with this one to get the full effect.

 

Music used in this episode:

Dan Weiss Trio - Timshel

Prelude

Always Be Closing

Dan Weiss - Starebaby

Veiled

 

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Oct 6, 2019

“We live to learn; to grow.”

Justin Brown is a world-class bi-coastal musician originally from Oakland, California. He has gained a notable reputation as both a bandleader for his project, Nyeusi, as well as a sideman for Thundercat, Ambrose Akinmusire, Christian McBride, Kenny Garrett, Esperanza Spalding among others.

Justin grew up with gospel music, as his mother, Nona is a gospel singer and pianist. Music chose Justin, not the other way around. As he explains in this interview, his mother would feel Justin kicking to the beat as she played her music when she was pregnant with him. He attended Berkeley High School and attended a summer music program for several years. Both he and Ambrose went to the same school and began their friendship there.

Justin eventually would receive a fully paid scholarship to attend the esteemed music school, Juilliard. This lasted for one day. Justin was offered to tour and also felt that for him to grow he had to experience music in the real world instead of being subjected to more traditional methods of education. Essentially, he wanted to form his ideas about music on his terms.

To my knowledge, this is the first-ever podcast episode featuring Justin. He has received a lot of positive press concerning his debut album, Nyeusi, but until now we have not heard him speak on a podcast about his life, career, and artistic process.

You Will Hear About….

  • Justin’s early formative years with music.
  • Does natural talent exist?
  • Justin’s beliefs on giving back.
  • The importance of patience.
  • The costs involved in getting where he is with his craft.
  • Justin’s approach to leading his own band Nyeusi.
  • How to maintain control of yourself when we become overloaded with sensation during a performance.
  • Justin’s thoughts on improvised music.
  • Why we should abandon the security of being a big fish in a small pond.


Why Should You Listen?

This episode is a reminder of why we must remain humble in the pursuit of knowledge and our greatness. It can be easy to become disenchanted with all of what we don’t understand and feeling defeated that we can’t reach our fullest potential.

Justin is a world-class musician who has devoted his life to music. Just listen to how sincerely humble he is. Justin is a fantastic example of a person who understands the importance of learning, giving back, being honest, working hard and exercising patience. We can all use this message to check ourselves from time to time.

 

Music used in this episode:

 

NYEUSI

Lesson 1: Dance

Lots for Nothin’

Lesson 2: Play

Waiting on Aubade

Entering Purgatory

Jupiter’s Giant Red Spot

Burniss

Circa 45

 

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Sep 29, 2019

“I’m in awe of what we all are as human beings and what we all have the capacity to do.”

Gary Husband has had an interesting and varied career it would seem. He began playing with Allan Holdsworth in the late 70’s — 79’ if I am not mistaken — John McLaughlin, Billy Cobham, Todd Sucherman, Randy Brecker and the list goes on and on. The man has experienced so much as a musician and so to have him on this podcast was certainly an honor.

Gary began playing piano at a young age and was classically trained. There was a lot of theory, practice and no shortage of confinement. It wasn’t until he found the drums that he saw freedom. I wonder if freedom to express came more easily on the piano after he had spent time learning the drums? Either way, he is brilliant on both instruments and is recognized for his ability which is apparent given the company he keeps.

Aside from being a sideman for so many unbelievable artists, Gary is also a bandleader and has released many works under his name and other project-based recordings. One such band was Gary Husband’s Drive which released a record called “Hotwired”. With that record, Gary wanted to pay a little nod to some of the drumming greats who were bandleaders as well who influenced him. He also recorded an album where he interpreted Allan Holdsworth's music and one where he interpreted John McLaughlin. I highly recommend checking these out as well as “A Meeting of Spirits”.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Gary’s new video cast series and some of the philosophies within it and why he decided to make it.
  • Not seeing yourself for who you really are.
  • Using our intuition to be responsible but also free in music.
  • Why having a personality prone to serving others makes for a better musician.
  • Are there aspects about being a musician that can’t be taught?
  • How musicians can find enjoyment in music they don’t enjoy playing.
  • Managing our expectations.

 

Why Should You Listen?

This is a conversation with one of the finest musicians in the world. With that being said, I think that this is more than worth your time to check out. We get deep with topics that are hard to quantify and explain but we try to make sense of what he, and to a lesser extent, I understand. It is nice to have this type of conversation with someone as warm and thoughtful as Gary. This conversation encourages us to think more for ourselves.

That is what I feel this episode brings forward. It’s a couple of perspectives about some things that we as musicians experience but may find difficulty expressing into words. But what is important is that we decide for ourselves what we want out of this and pursue that was honest intentions.

 

Music used in this episode:

Gary Husband’s Drive: Hotwired

Angel’s Over City Square

Heaven In My Hands

 

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Sep 22, 2019

“People talk about what makes money as if it’s the same thing as being good!”

Damani and Somadhi (AKA Stixx) are the people behind the very popular DrumTrax app. With nearly 40,000 users, together they have created an exceptional service for drummers all over the world to jam to tracks created for FREE! They also host their podcast called “Drum Code” where they have had guests such as Eric Moore II and Devin Sumner. In addition to guest interviews, they often have solo shows where they explore deep subject matter that many of us likely consider regularly. They are also involved musically together in their band called Mino Yanci.

They also offer lessons through their DrumTrax YouTube channel where both Stixx and Damani share lessons and concepts to consider and apply within your drumming.

I have seen their tracks being used for online content all over social media for quite some time now. Very recently, Juan Carlito Mendoza performed and taught lessons at Drumeo. One of the tracks Juan performed to was, in fact, a tune composed by Damani titled “Odd Movements”. This tune is one among many drumless tracks featured within the DrumTrax app.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • The origins of the DrumTrax app, which takes us all the way back to Mike Johnston’s DrumLab.
  • Smoke and mirrors. What we see online vs what things really are.
  • Musicians who work hard at their craft in hopes of earning a lot of money vs for the sake of art.
  • Damani’s belief that by proclaiming you are a “pocket drummer” is a limiting belief.
  • The Dunning-Kruger effect.
  • Facing your own insecurities and dealing with them.
  • Managing your expectations with making music/performing.
  • Learning how to become an instrument of creativity.
  • The importance of serving through music.

 

Why Should You Listen?

This episode is FILLED with inspiration. Stixx and Damani share their points of view on intentions with art. They express their discontent for anyone who explores music for the sake of money and fame. We talk about insecurities, managing our expectations and why we shouldn’t stop developing once we feel we have learned enough.

Towards the end of this episode, the conversation is truly impactful. We talk about how music and creativity flow through us and that we must allow that to happen without getting in the way. It gets a bit spiritual but from where I view this, and them too, making art IS about spirituality. It may not seem that way for everyone. For some, it may just be about learning, executing, listening, and essentially being a team player. But for some, it goes deeper than that. In my experiences music has always moved me in a way that I have difficulty explaining. It is powerful and it is a blessing that should be held with high esteem.

By learning and developing skills, it allows us to respond to what comes through us. As Paul Wertico said numerous times in a recent episode, “the music plays me”. I believe that you will powerfully receive this message. This and many other parts of the conversation struck a strong response from these gentlemen and myself.

 

Music used in this episode:

An assortment of DrumTrax app tracks

 

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Sep 15, 2019

“For me, I agree that we don’t want to be a novelty”

Sam is the drummer of melodic death/thrash metal band Dead Asylum and writer for Drumeo. She has toured a lot in her twenty years of playing the drums, including Europe and all over North America. Originally from Vancouver, Canada, Sam now lives in Montreal where she works from home and can take her work life on the road as well.

I asked Sam to be on the show for a couple of reasons. One being the fact that we actually work together. She is the person who takes these show notes and posts them to Drumeo Beat each week. We frequently email due to our work but have never had a conversation, so I thought to myself, “why not establish that connection over a podcast!?” The other reason is because I have interviewed only a handful of women on this show and I want to feature more women on this podcast.

Sam exhibits a great deal of professionalism through her drumming and her writing. Her career is a fantastic example of the modern drummer fusing more than one skill into creating a sustainable career within this often difficult industry.

Sam endorses Sabian Cymbals, Mapex Drums and Los Cabos Drumsticks.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • The reality of being a female drummer
  • Why Sam chose drums and about her formative years as a drummer
  • External vs Internal motivation
  • Risk vs reward
  • Being an eternal student with music
  • Metalhead culture
  • Perfectionism
  • Living with your own work for long periods of time

 

Why Should You Listen?

I think that in many people’s minds there is an elephant in the room when it comes to female drummers. Maybe a couple. Both are addressed in this episode. One being the reality of being a female drummer in an industry that is - and has largely been - dominated by men for many years. What do these women have to put up with from the ignorance of both women and men? It must become incredibly frustrating to hear such things as, “oh, you must be the singer!”, or “oh how nice, is this snare drum a gift for your boyfriend?” It hasn’t quite become a thing yet where when people see a woman carrying drum equipment that it might actually belong to them. Imagine that!

The other point mentioned is in regards to objectifying women. Again, it is a male dominated industry. So, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that many people watching women play drums are men. I think you know where I am going with this — don’t you? Yes, the age old saying, “men are pigs”, while it shouldn’t be a generalization, still holds for many men. Sam shares the odd requests that she receives privately from guys. It does enforce the saying mentioned above and, unfortunately, she is treated this way. While the frequency of these requests aren’t disclosed, the fact that it happens at all is disappointing. I hope that the men who listen to this show, which is the majority audience, considers this and if they do happen to see something online publicly that is unacceptable that something is said to prevent this from happening more than it already does.

 

Music used in this episode:

Dead Asylum - Death Always Wins

 

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Sep 8, 2019

“Can you become a better person and simultaneously help your surroundings and improve other people’s lives? Then you got it all figured out! Now just keep doing that day in day out and enjoy it. That’s how you live a good life, I think.”

Siros Vaziri is a Swedish drummer and entrepreneur. He is one of the very few who have managed to exist on social media and turn his online presence into a business within the drumming community. With a highly engaged audience on Instagram and Facebook, Siros has painstakingly ensured that he inspires his audience to find more productivity and personal growth in their lives.

His original concept, “Fill Of The Day”, blew up gaining him a tremendous audience. This method of direct teaching was just the beginning of his journey of creating an online business. He then began creating a la carte products that contained lessons that pushed the level of quality up from his regular social media posts. Since then, he has been gigging, hosting drum camps at his studio, diving headfirst into physical fitness and nutrition, and most recently his newest endeavor “Daily Drum Bites” which is a subscription-based service.

Siros never ceases to amaze me due to his dedication to his path. He is constantly evolving and showing us the power of proper social media management and entrepreneurship. For someone in their early twenties, Siros is a fantastic role model for all people in this community.  He demonstrates that if we stick to something, over time a net positive result is possible.

Siros endorses Tama, Meinl Cymbals, Evans and Promark.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Siros’ new subscription service “Daily Drum Bites”
  • How people connect with online branding
  • The reality of subscriber/follower counts vs paying customers and super fans
  • Thoughts about why people place such a low value on online media
  • Smartphone addiction and the benefits to disciplined usage and mono tasking
  • Siros’ average screen time on his smartphone
  • The virtues of social media and communicating with our audience
  • Siros’ journey to healthier living through good nutrition and exercise
  • The long-term virtues of investing in yourself even when it doesn’t give you a direct monetary return

 

Why Should You Listen?

This episode contains a lot of conversations that are often avoided in our community. I have been asked personally by aspiring content creators on how to start something like a podcast. Almost every single time the idea of monetization is brought into question. I always suggest to people that this is not the thing we need to aspire towards. Consider the early stages of content creating a free education rather than giving things away. Eventually, you will learn a lot about how this is done and perhaps an opportunity will come as a result. But most importantly you must LOVE what you are doing and treat it as a nice hobby in the beginning.

Another part of this conversation that really bears tremendous value is the topic of mono-tasking within a world of smartphone addiction. It is true that many of us have an issue with ignoring our phones because they are always calling us. I personally feel that our quality of life becomes deeply affected by this addiction. There is nothing wrong with the phones themselves and in many cases, it is a tremendously powerful and helpful technology to make our lives more interesting and engaging. But we MUST maintain a sense of discipline of ourselves when it comes to this. Between these two topics alone, this podcast is something you really need to check out.

 

Siros’ Socials

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Drumeo Gab’s Socials

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Sep 1, 2019

“I feel pretty fearless because of all the crazy stuff I’ve done. But it’s also just trust and life is life and you kinda just go with the flow. And that is what makes life interesting ya know? If it’s predictable then I think you lose the now.”

Paul Wertico is a performer, teacher, bandleader, and clinician. He is a seven time Grammy award winner, Readers Poll winner for Modern Drummer magazine and DRUM! Magazine, 2004 Chicago Tribune “2004 Chicagoan of the Year” among many other lifetime accolades. He is most famously known as Pat Metheny’s drummer for 18 years but should not be pigeon-holed into only that role. He is also a bandleader for his Paul Wertico Trio and improvisational trio Wertico, Cain, and Grey. He is highly experimental with his approach and the instruments he tends to use during his performances including bizarre cymbals, kitchen sinks, and other strange percussion instruments. Claiming that “music plays me”, Paul is a devout musician who lives for the moment of what music can bring.

In this episode, we will hear about many of his deep philosophies on performing on the drums, how the human element of imperfection brings out the real beauty in art, how we can become more confident and rooted in what we as artists connect with, and much more!

Paul endorses DW Drums, ProMark, Remo and Shure.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Paul’s adventures in Russia, Spain, Italy and China this summer. 
  • Paul’s high energy levels at the age of 66 even after recently needing surgery for two heart stints. He left for Spain three days later.
  • The time Paul flew a Robin aircraft as a reward for getting a fan an extra Pat Metheny ticket.
  • The grey areas in music and art that brings life and character to any given work.
  • Letting the music play you.
  • What a “front beat” is.
  • How we as drummers can tap into what connects us to our playing confidently.
  • Learning how to judge what your playing ACTUALLY sounds like while you play.

 

Why Should You Listen?

People should pay close attention to his philosophies about the relationship between life and the flow of it in particular. If there are musicians out there that have a lot of knowledge and understanding of vocabulary but feel like they aren’t allowing their creativity to flow out of them, you will find this episode particularly helpful. He also shares his perspectives on phrasing ideas with his coined term “front beat” and how that can bring forward a stronger sense of time and pulse within the music.

Beyond that, Paul is simply a nice person to listen to. He is incredibly thoughtful, filled with great stories to enhance his perspectives, and is incredibly experienced with this art form. He has been featured on many podcasts in the past, so if this episode interests you, I would recommend checking out any other podcasts that he has been a guest on.

 

Music featured in this episode:

 

“Another Side” - Paul Wertico Trio

 

A Slow Stroll Round a Black Hole

Ain’t No Thing

The Noisy Neighbour

O Man

 

“Short Cuts: 40 Improvisations” - Wertico, Cain & Grey

 

Exploring

The Creator

Always

In a Sea of Souls

 

Photo cred: George Burrows “Drummer Photographer”

 

Paul’s Socials

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Drumeo Gab’s Socials

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