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Drumeo Gab Podcast

Are ya tired of hearing, "so, like, uhh talk to me about how you started playing drums" in drumming podcasts? I'm gonna say, probably not as much as the guests are. I dunno, I think it's better to cut to the chase and explore pinpoint moments in their lives by forming curiosities around my research :0 IF YOU ARE DOWN FOR THAT; WELCOME! (Side Note: I strongly believe that the best part of the podcasting experience for listeners is the ability to connect with the host. So, don't be shy :)
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Now displaying: February, 2019
Feb 24, 2019

a·vant-garde

/ˌaväntˈɡärd/

noun: avant-garde



new and unusual or experimental ideas, especially in the arts, or the people introducing them



 

Dan Mayo is an incredibly expressive drummer hailing from Tel Aviv, Israel who specializes in an avant-garde approach to the drum set. He endorses A&F drums, Meinl cymbals, and Vic Firth drum sticks. Along with playing drums, Dan also composes and produces music for his band TATRAN.

 

This interview was recorded in Anaheim, CA on January, 24th 2019.

 

What we talked about (in order)

 

- We begin the interview by contemplating the following list of components to drumming.

 

Creativity, Timekeeping, Endurance, Independence, Coordination, Groove, Chops, Technique

 

Dan sorts out the importance of this list by ranking them in order of most important to least important. We deeply discuss each of the components and fall into many rabbit holes along the way.

 

- As we wrap up the list of components, we discover that technique is not very important to Dan. Dan’s belief is that the technique develops over time through playing the instrument. Or we develop particular techniques to properly express through the variety of instruments on a drum set. This leads Dan to explain how he feels that practice pads are of no use to a drummer. He doesn’t understand why drummers are the only musicians that play on something other than the actual instrument, which is the drum set. I have a feeling that many drummers will debate this section of the interview, but it does, in fact, make a lot of sense to me what he says about practice pads.

 

- Dan’s style of playing is incredibly expressive and he uses a lot of dynamics. So I ask him about how dynamics play a role in his expression and why they are important. This leads to how colors, shapes, and even smells play a part in how Dan’s approach will be influenced by these senses and metaphors.

 

- Dan decides to add something to the list and that is commitment. We talk about risk-taking, how to commit to the audience, and how to be vulnerable to allow the moment to come through when he plays.

 

- An incredibly interesting metaphor that Dan brings up more than once is how he feels that he is “a tube with two holes” and what this represents are input and output. If good energy and vibes are coming in, the output will be amazing. He talks quite deeply about how this is essential to him finding the highs of making music that he needs as an artist.

 

- How many shows that Dan performs are great, good, and crappy and how does he deal with the undesirable outcomes? Or are the shows he thought were bad, actually good? We explore how the moment, adrenaline, our own perceptions can alter reality.

 

- Dan shares what his fans can expect and look forward to in 2019. This includes his Masterclass that will be recorded and filmed for internet consumption that is titled “Inner Voice” which ironically this interview captured most of the content that is planned for this Masterclass. So if you enjoyed this interview and Dan’s philosophies, I am certain that you will enjoy Dan’s “Inner Voice” Masterclass.

 

- Dan talks about the importance of loving yourself and how if you do embrace yourself, you will play better. This is one of my personal favorite sections of this conversation. It is absolutely true and also is grossly overlooked and under-discussed.

 

- Lastly, we wrap things up by talking about the truth to one’s playing. How do we know if something is bullshit or the real thing?

 

Click this link to enroll in Dan Mayo's "Inner Voice" Masterclass


ALL CLIPS USED IN THIS EPISODE CAN BE FOUND AT DAN’S YOUTUBE CHANNEL HERE. CLICK THE LINK TO WATCH.

 

TATRAN on Spotify


Dan’s Socials

Website

Instagram

Facebook

 

Drumeo Gab’s Socials

Instagram

Facebook


Drumeo’s Socials

Website

Instagram

Facebook

YouTube

 

Jingle Credits

Music Production/Mastering - Kingmobb

Voice Over - Tom Knight

Drums - Me

Recording Engineer - Michael Marucci

Feb 10, 2019

Claus Hessler is a well-known drummer and educator located in Germany. He has authored several educational books such as Camp Duty Update, Drum Set Workout, and Open-handed playing Vol 1&2. He also performs with his funk/fusion band Flux. Claus does fly under the radar somewhat in the drum community but has carved out a long and prosperous career with education and performance.

 

Click HERE to learn more about Claus' book "Camp Duty Update"

 

What we talked about (in order)

 

- Claus talks about his rope tuned solid Ash wood drum in significant detail and gives me a small tour of his home studio.

 

- This interview was recorded January 3rd, 2019, so naturally, I wanted to know how Claus’ new year has been treating him so far.

 

- Claus and Dom Famularo go way back. Claus talks about how Dom played a big role in Claus’ development both in his playing but also with an opportunity within the industry.

 

- Claus is hugely interested in drum history. Swiss rudiments, medieval drums, techniques to name a few. I bring up the Tabor and the open-handed roll. Claus clears up some misinterpretation within this subject.

 

- We fall into a rabbit hole which, if I sum it up, is about intentions and purpose to drumming in music. We begin with the Tabor. A medieval drum that accompanied a fife and was played with one blunt stick. Then we end up talking about if and how different time periods affect a musician. This is highly speculative, but interesting subject matter.

 

- Camp Duty Update has been receiving some notoriety lately. With the 2018 Best Educational Material nomination from Modern Drummer, I had to ask what his mission was in writing that material.

 

- Claus has authored a great deal of educational material to the drumming world. He discusses with me how his students are his beta testers and allow Claus to see directly what needs to be included or not to develop a great piece of educational material.

 

- The mileage that you can get out of one rudiment opposed to memorizing fifty rudiments and barely scratching the surface, is a concept that Claus is very interested in. How to “hide” rudiments effectively in musical settings is what he believes more drummers ought to do. This part is like having a lesson with Claus.

 

- With educators, I sometimes sense that there is a lot of calculation in their approach to what they play and so it comes out sounding very “beige” and exercise-y sounding. That doesn’t apply to all educators obviously, and therein lies the question. How does a player, who teaches, maintain a sense of character and a distinct sound?

 

- Claus talks about his early career doubts and fears. He’s good now though. In all seriousness though, Claus gets into some great commentary about human nature and by sharing this stuff with other people is a sign of maturity and strength.

 

- “If you don’t sound like shit, you’re not practicing” This is a quote we all know and love, isn’t it? Of course, this statement is true, but does it lead a focus of persuading a student to focus on their weaknesses? Claus explains his point of view towards this.

 

- This conversation sparked a question that I didn’t anticipate asking, but I ask Claus what his thoughts are on pacing yourself on new material. I use an analogy where my fist represents my size of abilities. Then my other hand and fingers represent the new things that you want to add, that you will inevitably suck at. How much of the new stuff should you add, and how long does it take to fuse to the total sum of your abilities. This leads to perhaps the most interesting part of this episode.

 

Claus' Socials

Instagram

Facebook

Website

 

Drumeo Gab's Socials

Instagram

Facebook

 

Drumeo's Socials

Instagram

Facebook

YouTube

Website

 

Click HERE to watch Claus' free Drumeo Lesson!

 

Jingle Credits

Music Production/Mastering - Kingmobb

Voice Over - Tom Knight

Drums - Me

Recording Engineer - Michael Marucci

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