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Drumeo Gab Podcast

Are ya tired of hearing, "so, like, uhh talk to me about how you started playing drums" in drumming podcasts? I'm gonna say, probably not as much as the guests are. I dunno, I think it's better to cut to the chase and explore pinpoint moments in their lives by forming curiosities around my research :0 IF YOU ARE DOWN FOR THAT; WELCOME! (Side Note: I strongly believe that the best part of the podcasting experience for listeners is the ability to connect with the host. So, don't be shy :)
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Now displaying: April, 2020
Apr 29, 2020

VIP is created in part by YOU, the audience. Submit your media to Seamus@drumeo.com.

 

Today's episode deals with our drumming influences. I take a deep dive into my top 10 drumming influences, comment reads, and other ramblings.

 

The beat featured today comes from Austin Koziol.

Apr 26, 2020

“I allow it to be what it is.”

Steve Smith is a treasure to drumming culture. He was inducted into the “Rock and Roll Hall of Fame”, he’s been awarded many times over in the industry including the Modern Drummer readers poll where he was voted “Best All-Around Drummer” five years in a row. The list goes on and on and you will always find him on the top 100 drummers of all time lists as well. There is no question that Steve Smith is one of the finest drummers in history.

He is probably best known to most people as the drummer for Journey. He would end up recording six albums, including Journey’s most popular album “Escape”, during his tenure with them. However, regardless of his massive success with Journey, Steve is a jazz drummer at heart. He has been the bandleader of his group Vital Information since the early seventies and of course, in between has been a sideman for artists such as Jean-Luc Ponty, Steps Ahead, Dweezil Zappa, Bryan Adams, Savage Garden and many others.

What I find personally fascinating about Steve is his evolution as a musician. When I watch performances from the ’70s and ’80s, I hear a completely different Steve Smith than what he is today. With his introduction to Carnatic music by the great Zakir Hussain, Steve’s path went far in that direction. If you look at his path of development, he has had many deep periods of growth. In my opinion, I can’t think of many drummers who have mastered as many disciplines within drumming as Steve has.

I would imagine that Steve will always be on a path of discovery and refinement with music and drumming. Even quite recently, since COVID-19, he has stated that he has gone back to basics, practicing slowly. Even after over 60 years of playing the drums, Steve is still going back to basics to continue improving and evolving and that is truly inspiring.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Steve’s headaches with being a bandleader.
  • How Steve allows musicians’ true selves to alter the delivery of his music.
  • The fascinating story of how Steve was introduced to Carnatic and Hindustani music.
  • Steve’s approach to learning new music quickly.
  • Steve’s drum art.
  • Steve on pursuing our creative passions.
  • Steve’s experience adapting and transitioning to learning how to play with a click.
  • The value of seeing live music.

 

Why Should You Listen?

Well, an interview with Steve Smith is not something to pass on. He has so much knowledge that is backed up by profound levels of experience. He is someone we should be listening to and learning from. Besides that, his story about how he learned Konnakol and his time with Zakir is truly fascinating stuff.

 

Steve’s Socials

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Photo: Ronn Dunnett

Apr 22, 2020

VIP is created in part by YOU, the audience. Submit your media to Seamus@drumeo.com

 

In this episode, we talk about the prospect of taking on big projects.

 

Joshua Green - Instagram

Joshua Green's video from a defunct nuclear turbine (this is amazing and you should watch it.)

Kenton Bell - Instagram

Apr 19, 2020

“I play because I need to play. For me.”

Havana, Cuba native, Horacio “el Negro” Hernandez, has been said to be one of the most innovative and skilled percussionists in the world. He has had a very rich musical life growing up in Havana and then many years later when he left home to become an internationally acclaimed musician. It did not come easily but as Horacio describes in this interview, it has always been his passion in life and he has never considered doing anything else. 

Horacio has had the pleasure of working with so many incredible artists throughout his career including Carlos Santana, Zucchero, Steve Winwood, McCoy Tyner, Michel Camilo, and the Tropi-Jazz All Stars of the late Tito Puente. Horacio is also a Grammy award winning artist, which he received in 1997.

I have personally been in love with Horacio’s playing for 20 years. Back when it was new, the Modern Drummer 2000 DVD featured Horacio. I remember watching his clips, along with Vinnie, Dave Lombardo, Billy Ward and Hilary Jones over and over. Among the roster, it was Horacio who captured my attention the most. He was always smiling and acting so casually while playing incredibly demanding music and displaying some of the most advanced independance I have ever seen before or since then. To have a moment with one of my heroes was simply incredible and it is an interview that I will never forget.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Horacio talks about his performance at Drumeo Festival 2020.
  • What drumming means to him. 
  • Why he was imprisoned at the age of 13.
  • Imitating our idols and Horacio’s thoughts on the younger generations.
  • His three year stay in Rome back in 1990.
  • Horacio’s appreciation for a great instrument to play.
  • His career once he was given permission to emigrate to the USA.
  • Horacio’s health concerns from roughly five years ago.
  • What Horacio learned from playing 20 hours a day at the EGREM studios.
  • Why you don’t see Horacio much on Instagram (usually, until CoV happened)

 

Why Should You Listen?

It is rare to see an interview with Horacio in English. Even rarer is to hear and see an interview with Horacio with good sound and video quality. He is quiet online usually and isn’t that concerned with publicity. For Horacio, this was just fun for him to talk about his life and I feel fortunate that he took the time to do it. Again, he is a veteran musician with a storied career and has almost no need for publicity. 

However, this interview covers a lot of his musical career, his thoughts about drumming and music and a nearly catastrophic medical issue that could have ended his career that he has never spoken publicly about. So, if you are a fan of Horacio you won’t want to sleep on this episode. 

 

Horacio’s Socials

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Photo: Ronn Dunnett

Apr 15, 2020

VIP is created in part by YOU, the audience. Submit your media to Seamus@drumeo.com.

 

Today's episode is themed around two different story types. The first one is about drummers who started playing drums later into their adulthood. The other is about drummers who used to play when they were in their youth and then retired the sticks only to rediscover their passion for drumming years later.

 

The submissions for this week came from Ed Koop, Bill Granville, Robert Daughtridge, and Jorge Bazo.

 

I also read a bunch of comments from last week's question on my Instagram

 

"Who started playing drums later in life, or picked up the sticks after a long hiatus?"

 

We received over 70 comments, so I read a few of them. I also share my own experience with a long hiatus from drums that took place during my twenties.

 

To top it all off I have included a teaser of the upcoming interview with Horacio "el Negro" Hernandez. Enjoy and stay safe :)

 

Apr 12, 2020

"My pain is my sound"

Chris Coleman’s story will give a lot of hope to drummers out there who are trying their absolute best to become who they want to become. He is a fighter, a survivor and has been put through hell to get where he is today. He has been considered, in the public’s eye, a fantastic drummer for many years. His win back in 2001 for the Guitar Center DrumOff was such a huge affirmation to Chris that he was indeed on the right path. But it always wasn’t so clear.

In this interview, you are going to hear about the pain and struggle that was necessary to get to the place that he has arrived. Chris has such a long and meandering path of little victories and big setbacks. At a certain point, he tried to kill his passion for drumming that he had inside of him. It is incredible how he persevered and once he moved to LA things started to work in his favor and he was well on his way to his well-earned destination.

When we watch Chris perform we can sit back and enjoy the product. And really, we should. But to hear where that sound was born from adds a completely new layer of depth. This is why interviews can be important. His career was born out of something that was constantly working against him and eventually through sheer determination he managed to forge an elite tier status on the instrument. Simply incredible.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Chris arrived at a good place with the Drumeo Festival
  • His early years growing up with music in Church
  • Discovering the true you
  • Don’t copy other drummers’ licks. Instead, Focus on your sound.
  • Chris on haters
  • The importance of control over speed
  • Why he couldn’t be a pilot or Navy Seal
  • The road to LA
  • Instant gratification and investing in maybes

 

Why Should You Listen?

In these times during COVID-19, this interview may have more power to it? Regardless, in any situation for any person, there is some pretty significant value here. Chris’ story is filled with darkness and then at the end, parting clouds and some sunshine. But I just see life screaming at Chris, “STOP DOING THIS!” and he responded with a hard NO. I have so much respect for that. That takes some serious determination and willpower and it is great to hear it told in such raw detail from an elite drummer. It is an unbelievable chat with a timeless message.

 

Chris’ Socials

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Photo: Ronn Dunnett

Apr 8, 2020

Sign up for only $5 (all proceeds go to the Covid Solidarity Response Fund) to enroll in the Drumeo Learn Songs Faster Masterclass. This is for a limited time only. (Closes April 10th at Midnight)

 

VIP is created in part by YOU, the audience. Submit your media to Seamus@drumeo.com.

 

Update on Ian - Ian and his wife Joanna have returned home to Toronto safe and sound. Yay!!

 

Lou Santiago Jr. talks about his experience working in the ER in NYC during the Covid pandemic.

 

Here is the link to the podcast where the astronaut Scott Kelly provides advice for people in isolation.

 

Here is the link to Austin's new podcast.

Apr 5, 2020

Sign up for only $5 (all proceeds go to the Covid Solidarity Response Fund) to enroll in the Drumeo Learn Songs Faster Masterclass. This is for a limited time only.

 

“Something changed. It was a heavy time.”

Anika Nilles has built quite an impressive career for herself over the last six years or so. Her profile blossomed into international status almost overnight with the release of “Wild Boy” on YouTube. From there, she has gained considerable exposure and has been in high demand for clinics and other educational platforms, such as Drumeo. It could be argued that Anika was one of the main influencers on the popularity of quintuplet phrasings but also disguised them well to make these odd-phrasing ideas approachable and musical.

This was the second interview opportunity that I have had with Anika. The first was over two years ago where we spoke over Skype while she was home on a quick break. It was amazing to have her on the podcast but also quite disappointing to me personally due to the outcome of the audio I recorded. It was compromised heavily due to static and other noise that I couldn’t remove from the recording. I have always been a bit upset by that. However, this episode sounds quite good and the conversation is so much more compelling than the first one we had. I feel like I got the interview with Anika that I always wanted.

Anika opens up here. She discusses things that she has never discussed publicly and perhaps to an even further extent, at all. I am very thankful that she was so willing to be transparent and honest about her career, the obstacles that have been challenging and the things that still trouble her to this day.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Stage fright
  • Needing control
  • Anika’s thoughts on musical freedom
  • What really happened on October 18, 2017’s announcement
  • Anika’s objectives right now
  • Looking on the bright side
  • American influence on European drummers
  • How viable is the online influencer option today?
  • Does Anika know how to future proof her career?
  • The best nights of music aren’t always the ones you thought were great at the time.

 

Why Should You Listen?

This is the interview you have never heard before. In fact, I was in disbelief after the interview just how open Anika was. I pushed a bit into territory that was a bit vulnerable for her but she didn’t shy away from the questions. She really put herself out there in an honest and transparent way. Anika has a lot of fans who see her as a deeply inspiring drummer and personality and the things she discussed with me will likely end up furthering that feeling for her fans. She is an exemplary person who shows us that the top level professionals have fears too. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1AtfdNKYug

 

Anika’s Socials

ANIKA”S NEW ALBUM - For A Colourful Soul

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Apr 1, 2020

VIP is created in part by YOU, the audience. Submit your media to Seamus@drumeo.com.

 

Ned's Facebook Live interview that I talked about.

https://umatter.ca/2020/03/28/embracing-kindness/

 

Rich Stitzel's DrumMantra podcast where I was interviewed live.

https://player.fm/series/the-drummantra-podcast

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