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Drumeo Gab Podcast

Are ya tired of hearing, "so, like, uhh talk to me about how you started playing drums" in drumming podcasts? I'm gonna say, probably not as much as the guests are. I dunno, I think it's better to cut to the chase and explore pinpoint moments in their lives by forming curiosities around my research :0 IF YOU ARE DOWN FOR THAT; WELCOME! (Side Note: I strongly believe that the best part of the podcasting experience for listeners is the ability to connect with the host. So, don't be shy :)
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Now displaying: August, 2020
Aug 30, 2020

“Four on the floor. This is the most important groove in the history of drumming.”

Yoni Madar is an Israeli multi-instrumentalist. He is known well by the drumming community online as “not human”, “alien” and many other other-wordly descriptions. Truth is, Yoni has been practicing a lot over the last thirty years or so. He has mastered four instruments (Guitar, Bass, Keys, and Drums). As a side note: if keys could be played both on the left and right side he would have mastered that too because he can with the other three.

Yoni has chosen a path that does not involve himself with celebrities. Instead, he writes, performs and records his own music, performs locally, and teaches his methods to students. He recently released his video course and book where he presents his methods of teaching that he claims are unique. 

Yoni has taken the art of drumming to an incredibly high level. If drumming was featured as an Olympic sport, I would imagine that Yoni would be Israel's shining star to win the Gold medal. There are very few drummers that I have witnessed who possess his level of independence and technical facility. Go look him up if you don’t know Yoni Madar yet and have your mind blown.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Yoni’s take on people’s common reaction to his abilities.
  • Why technique is so important.
  • Thoughts about practice.
  • Yoni’s new record and how it was recorded in one take.
  • Approaching a drum solo with complete improvisation.
  • Why does every drummer need to be able to play Pink Floyd well?
  • Yoni’s video on the open/close technique and his new book.
  • Phil Collins and Genesis.

 

Why Should You Listen?

This is essential listening for drummers. It is basically an hour and a half long masterclass on why we need to practice our technique, play simple parts well, why we shouldn’t overthink our playing and that is just the beginning. Yoni has so much ability and the proof is everywhere online what this man can do. It is staggering to say the least. To hear him speak about why simple playing is not simple is a game changing message for drummers to recognize. I don’t say this much but this should not be passed over. You must listen to this.

 

Music used in this podcast comes from Yoni Madar’s new album Consultation

 

Yoni’s Socials

Instagram

YouTube

Website

 

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Aug 26, 2020

VIP is created in part by YOU, the audience. Submit your media to Seamus@drumeo.com

 

Today we are talking about making a statement with music.

 

Opening drumming/tune is performed by Ash Soan

 

Check out "Voodoo Or Die" on Spotify

 

Comment reads this week are from

 

@chris_hornbrook

@genestix.drumming

@claus.hessler

@milowicdrums

@laurenzodrums

@robert__brennan

@phoenixkatewale

@bigpopapump__

@__jaydenhall__

@mrkatiegraham

Aug 23, 2020

“I feel like this industry is always in upheaval and so you always have to be light on your feet.”

Dylan Wissing has a very unique situation brewing in his studio in the small city of Hoboken, NJ. He runs a multimedia based service called “Getting The Sound” which is based off of his immense knowledge and experience in recording drums but also re-creating drum breaks for current artists, mainly in the rap/pop genre. While this embodies a small amount of hired work in his entire career, it is still incredibly noteworthy. 

There are laws in music that prevent artists from sampling pre-recorded music or drum parts and Dylan is capable of recreating these drum parts the way they originally sounded making them virtually identical to the original. From what I understand, this is an absolutely painstaking affair to create and costs the artists a lot of money and therefore, it doesn’t happen much. However, this expertise has given Dylan quite an edge for providing the right sound for the song.

Of course, Dylan is primarily a session musician who works out of his studio fulfilling artists with drum tracks every single week. He is no stranger to the industry and has experienced the ups and downs of being a professional musician. In this episode we are all reminded of what being a musician is really about.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Balancing family life with music and how Covid changed things overnight.
  • How Dylan has adapted over the years within the industry.
  • Dylan’s thoughts on people who consider drummers as “unskilled laborers”.
  • Should drummers be generalists or specialized?
  • Our conversation regarding what drummers should focus on.
  • Dylan’s preference for analog vs digital sample production.
  • How Dylan managed to work with artists like Kanye, Jay Z, etc.
  • Some basic drum recording ideas.

 

Why Should You Listen?

I think that this episode showcases a very real situation. Dylan is an incredible drummer. He owns an immense collection of drums. He has a dedicated studio. He has a very nice resume. Yet, you can hear the struggles of being a working drummer in this conversation. The ups and downs. The situation with Covid. The constant uncertainty of whether work will continue to come in. How he balances his life with music. It is all here and nothing is sugar coated. All in all, this episode takes the glamour out of what being a musician is about and simply focuses on the reality. It takes a lot of guts, determination, passion and sacrifice and this episode nails that message.

 

Dylan’s Socials

Instagram

YouTube

Getting The Sound Instagram

Website

 

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Aug 19, 2020

VIP is created in part by YOU, the audience. Submit your media to Seamus@drumeo.com

 

Today we are talking about perfection.

 

Here is the link for Drums for Parkinson's

 

Opening drum clip performed by Brody Simpson

 

Email reads this week are from

 

Andrew Gaudet

Guilherme Maranhao

 

Comment reads this week are from

 

@tommyigoe

@sugarpercussion

@stevelymandrums

@ojaugustine

@claus.hessler

@greghersey

@groovru

@lynetteokoroike

@madmaxv1.1

@aaronlevydrums

@loncaricdenis

@mitch_thedrummer

@a.d.reger

Aug 16, 2020

“To me when you blackout, you zone out. That’s when you come into your own and then people can feel that.”

Daru Jones is a genre-bending drummer based out of Nashville who has worked with a large variety of artists over the course of his career. Whether it is rock music with Jack White or hip hop with Black Milk, Nas, or Pete Rock, Daru has proven over and over again how effective he is. Besides the drumming, he is also the owner of the boutique label RUSIC Records and a producer as well.

Daru has deliberately branded himself as a drummer who brings a certain specialty to the table. His touch and style are instantly recognizable to the ear and his drum setup is unmistakeable to the eyes. His approach to the industry has worked out well if you look up his credentials. 

 

You Will Hear About….

  • How Daru is maintaining during the pandemic.
  • Daru’s experiences playing these virtual concerts lately.
  • Knowing your worth and when to assert yourself with confidence.
  • Building an identifiable brand for yourself.
  • The lasting impact of playing in church.
  • The spirit of playing.
  • A studio secret from Daru.
  • The new record “One Mic and Drum” from Bobby J From Rockaway and Daru Jones.
  • Recovering from embarrassing situations.
  • Listener questions.

 

Why Should You Listen?

This chat with Daru is balanced. We have some deep knowledge and advice through actual experience of knowing your worth and the hustle side of the music industry, recovering from embarrassment, building a brand through your specialty, and some studio secrets. But then we also get the more spiritual side of Daru too which is wonderful to hear about.

I feel you will walk away from this one looking deeper inside yourself to better understand your voice and worth and further appreciate creativity and possibly even look at it in a way that you hadn’t before.

 

Daru’s Free Drumeo Lesson on YouTube!

 

Daru’s Socials

Instagram

YouTube

Facebook

Website

 

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Aug 12, 2020

VIP is created in part by YOU, the audience. Submit your media to Seamus@drumeo.com

 

Today we are talking about groove and chops.

 

Opening drum clip performed by Maison Guidry

 

Voice memos this week are from

 

Karl Grohmann

Rion Smith

 

Comment reads this week are from

 

@chris_paprota

@joelturcotte

@yoni_madar

@stanbicknell

@carbonedrums

@currencyaudio

@instantnoodlez__

@jrosenbeats

@eduardog.a.r.r.i.d.o

@__jadenhall__

@marcustsouniasdrummer_

Aug 9, 2020

“I’m not gonna wait. I’m gonna work for it.”

Greyson Nekrutman is an eighteen-year-old drummer from Long Island, NY. Like everyone, this year has been a bit strange for Greyson. Having eleven graduations at your high school with no prom is not something people are used to hearing about. However, with time off from school and completing classes online in the meantime means that he has been practicing drums a lot more these days. He was rejected from one music school he applied to recently and so he took that as a sign to work harder.

Since then, he has been endorsed by Vic Firth drumsticks, Meinl cymbals, and most recently, Pearl drums. 

The quote from Greyson really is what this one is about. He has worked really hard and it isn’t something that is necessarily celebrated among his peers. At the end of the day, he has made a choice to commit himself to music. It will be interesting to watch Greyson evolve and I am very excited to have been the first to host him on a podcast. 

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Graduating high school during a pandemic.
  • Greyson’s choice to commit to music and the backlash he has received for it.
  • Some thoughts about technology and screen addiction.
  • Drama and feeding on negativity.
  • An interesting story about how Greyson came to realize drums was his path.
  • Greyson’s work ethic and what drives it.
  • Listener questions.

 

Why Should You Listen?

This episode will be particularly beneficial for younger listeners of the show and I hope that younger drummers listen to it and receive something good from it. 

All of us need to feel purposeful and to have little victories along our way in life. But young people need to learn about long-term values that will help them in adulthood. To hear an eighteen-year-old kid talk about how he is going to work hard to get closer to his dreams is really great to hear.

I think that at Greyson’s age it is a great idea to build the thing that you wish to present. For a younger listener to hear about how drums positively affect Greyson is motivating stuff. 

 

Greyson’s Socials

Instagram

YouTube

 

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Aug 5, 2020

VIP is created in part by YOU, the audience. Submit your media to Seamus@drumeo.com

 

Today we are talking about comparing ourselves to others.

 

Opening drum clip performed by Joel Turcotte Taken from Dimitri Fantini's YouTube video "Impossible Hi-Hat Licks"

 

Drum madness midway through is by Forrest Rice.

 

The 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 etc. song by @soytiet

 

Voice Memos this week are from

Jacob Evans (his YouTube video on comparing process instead of results)

Greg Hersey

Joao Lebre

 

Email reads this week are from

Scott Amitrano

Curt "KIRKEE B." Bisquera

 

Comment reads this week are from

@dan_smith_music

@dunnettclassicdrums

@soundslikeadrum

@akhamie.music

@davidstanochschoolofdrumming

@rewellmusic

@ryanthomasmusician

@gregveachmusicalyeets

@jthomp10

@rolandjericlintag

@benedictlimbrey

@migueld.drums

@jon_on_drums

Aug 2, 2020

“I went so deep into the rabbit hole that I got lost.”

Andy Prado Jr. is an LA-based musician with some of the meanest chops around. He isn’t all chops though. Andy possesses a mixture of explosive creativity, dynamics, groove, and abstract rhythmic phrases within a large range of musical styles. He has his own progressive instrumental trio called Coevality while also being hired for a variety of other acts such as Sabrina Claudio.

Andy is a true devotee to the art of drumming and music. He has played for nearly his entire life and has sacrificed a lot over the course of his career to become the musician he is today. He considers his checkpoints in his journey to have come a bit late but he never lost hope. In this podcast, we discuss the costs involved to get to where he is today.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Adapting to the times as a musician and what Andy is specifically doing about that
  • Andy’s thoughts on sacrifice to the craft in order to obtain a balance with life
  • Why we need to enjoy the process
  • Setbacks throughout Andy’s path
  • Listener questions

 

Why Should You Listen?

There are many drummers out there who have an all or nothing approach to their craft. In Andy’s case, the obsession of drumming almost cost him his marriage. So, maybe we want to check this one out just to re-evaluate our priorities in life and make sure that everything that is important to us is being looked after and not neglected due to our obsessions.

 

Andy’s Socials

Instagram

YouTube

A Story by Andy Prado Video

 

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