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Drumeo Gab Podcast

Are ya tired of hearing, "so, like, uhh talk to me about how you started playing drums" in drumming podcasts? I'm gonna say, probably not as much as the guests are. I dunno, I think it's better to cut to the chase and explore pinpoint moments in their lives by forming curiosities around my research :0 IF YOU ARE DOWN FOR THAT; WELCOME! (Side Note: I strongly believe that the best part of the podcasting experience for listeners is the ability to connect with the host. So, don't be shy :)
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Now displaying: October, 2020
Oct 28, 2020

Today's episode is regarding preparation. I go over a handful of points as to why preparation is important. This episode was inspired by an email sent to me from Benny Greb regarding his new book. Click this link to learn more about his book.

 

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Oct 25, 2020

“I practiced every single minute I could! No question.”

Matt Bover is originally from the Woodstock, NY area where he would find his love for drums but it didn’t stop there. After a failed audition for Berklee College of Music, he decided to head to Barcelona, Spain at a music conservatory called “Barcelona’s Conservatori del Liceu”. He managed straight A’s while practicing drums for roughly fifteen hours per day while he studied there.

From Barcelona, he re-auditioned for Berklee and was accepted. Not only was he accepted into the school but he managed a full performance scholarship and later Berklee would pay Matt to attend their school! During his time at Berklee, he would maintain an unbelievable practice routine, and commonly he would practice for seventeen hours per day. He also wrote a book called Chops For The Modern Drummer which would later be distributed by Hudson Music.

Matt’s story is one that is bittersweet. It’s balanced between failure and success and while it is incredibly inspiring, it is also a bit heart wrenching. For example, his cymbals were stolen right from the school never to be recovered due to a faulty security camera. Also, Covid has prevented him from starting a really great teaching position in a school. The time away from music hasn’t been easy either. But Matt has persevered before and I know he can again. 

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Growing up in Woodstock, NY.
  • The trip to study in Barcelona and some key learning experiences there.
  • How by having the ability to choose what to learn produces a better experience.
  • The second audition at Berklee and studying there.
  • When his cymbals were stolen.
  • What his hopes are for the future.

 

Why Should You Listen?

Matt is a key example of why I choose to interview up and coming drummers. A lot of us can really connect with drummers who are working hard towards their goals. The successes and failures that we all experience at some point in our lives is also a realistic reminder of what we can expect when carving out our own paths. 

So, while it is fantastic to hear from artists who have created a legacy already, it is also nice to hear from those who are trying to do that currently and still have mileage left to get there. Also, for some reason, my heart really goes out to Matt. I don’t know exactly why but you may feel it too when you hear this one. He is a humble and hard-working dude that just loves drumming and teaching. He has had some upsets in his journey but he keeps on going and I really feel him with that. I have nothing but love for this guy.

 

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Oct 21, 2020

Drop a line to Amanda

 

I feel that these five tips for social media make for an experience that is more enjoyable long-term and better for my mental health.

 

1. When someone follows you, check out their profile. If it looks interesting, look a little deeper. If you really like what they are putting out there, give them a follow and make a comment. Connect with new people.

 

2. Don't fuss over numbers. Make good stuff that you like to make and present it. Hopefully it gets some attention and you did it your way. Just don't let the numbers dictate whether or not you want to do it or be validated by the numbers. Pay attention to how you can connect with people through the content.

 

3. When you have the opportunity, send voice dm's to your friends and audience online. Especially if they love what you do, make it more personable by sending them your voice. I have done this for a long time with DrumeoGab and I think it is a nice way to connect. Recommend.

 

4. Police your page. Show respect to your followers and friends by keeping your page a respectful and open environment. Hopefully, it is fun and enjoyable too. I immediately block and delete any comments that are insulting and intended to harm someone. That doesn't fly here and it shouldn't on your page either.

 

5. Just be yourself. Work hard and do your best. Present the things you are excited about and love. Don't worry about appealing to everyone and/or feeling overly vulnerable by putting yourself out there. You'll become comfortable eventually and you will thank yourself for that. So, if it is all coming from you, it can have more power and appeal. Almost every great thing that you really enjoy was made by people who just wanted to make something and they were good at it.

Oct 18, 2020

“It’s endless of how many different opportunities we can provide and create for ourselves.”

Greg Hersey is the Director of Instrumental Music at Episcopal School of Jacksonville and received his masters degree at University North Florida. He is a very well studied musician and has a passion for education as he is currently in his fourth year as band director.

He uses Instagram to showcase his talents and creativity with many of his videos reaching well into five-figure for the number of views. In particular, his trap set videos indicate his high level of musical knowledge and creative rhythmic applications.

I wanted Greg on the show because he works in the school system and with all of the changes that teachers face, I thought it would be very interesting to hear his perspective on how he and his colleagues have adapted to this new way of doing things. We also get an in-depth look as to how his love for drumming took shape and a few people in his life that pushed him to become who he is today.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • What it is like teaching in the school system today.
  • His first real drum lesson with Benjamin Wiseman and the impact that had.
  • Greg’s observations on support from home regarding music.
  • Intrinsic values vs extrinsic values.
  • Charlotte Mavery and the positive influence she had on Greg.

 

Why Should You Listen?

It is really interesting to hear about how within the education system things have changed and what faculty have to do now in order to satisfy the current situation we are in. Also, for people who may feel like they have a deep connection with something, it is great to hear a success story that involves a career path that is not always associated with the word “stable”. Greg managed to find a career that he strongly connects with and he finds a lot of pleasure in what he does professionally day to day.

 

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Oct 14, 2020

VIP is created in part by YOU, the audience. Submit your media to Seamus@drumeo.com

 

The opening clip was from Marcus Gilmore Excerpts of Nube by David Virelles. Performed with Sunhouse Sensory Percussion.

Watch the Video

 

Today we are discussing the idea of whether the drum heads are mostly responsible for the output of sound from a drum. This idea was inspired by this YouTube video - Watch Video

Oct 11, 2020

“I was meant to do it.”

Tony Royster Jr. is a household name in the industry and has been famously recognized by drummers all over the world since his drum solo that he performed at the age of twelve during the Modern Drummer Festival. He has since been mostly a touring musician with some of the biggest musical entertainers in the world, including Jay-Z and Katy Perry.

Times are changing though and with musicians essentially being pulled from touring, Tony has begun pivoting in his career. Private lessons, YouTube, and so on have been on his mind as things continue to change.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Tony’s decisions lately regarding his career.
  • Whether he believes in natural talent and his experiences in the early years of his life with music.
  • What it is like for him teaching when considering his innate abilities.
  • Tony’s thoughts on the generation he was born into.
  • Bowling.
  • What that Modern Drummer Festival solo meant to him.
  • A nerve-racking experience on Dave Letterman.
  • How social media affects our ability to socialize.

 

Why Should You Listen?

To hear Tony’s perspective on the questions raised in this interview is really interesting to hear. This situation has forced him to look at different ways of maintaining a career. For a drummer who has been blowing minds with his abilities all of these years, it is kind of unreal to hear him speak on how to keep it going.

 

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Oct 7, 2020

VIP is made in part by YOU, the audience. Submit your media to Seamus@drumeo.com

 

Today's episode deals with the importance of experiencing joy playing the drums, why I love drumming, and to encourage you to just play.

 

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Oct 4, 2020

“One of my youngest memories at four years old was him quitting drums in 1979, literally destroying his drum set.”

Jeremy Taggart is a household name in Canadian music due to his twenty-one-year career with the iconic rock band Our Lady Peace. Taggart began playing with OLP at the age of seventeen and from there on out he experienced life on the road playing packed venues and making records. In 2014 it all came to an end for him with OLP and he decided to reinvent himself. Enter Taggart & Torrens podcast.

Their podcast has been downloaded (at the time of writing this) over four million times! They have toured their musical/comedy act, wrote a best-selling book titled “Canadianity: Tales From The True North Strong And Freezing” and they even released an album this year titled “Bahds”. They have managed to create a buzz with their show by infusing strong Canadian flare that we Canucks can strongly relate to and a serious dose of comedy. 

On a more personal note, to record this episode was an absolute honour. Given the fact that I am Canadian and grew up during the era in which OLP was in the Canadian music spotlight, Taggart was definitely a major influence to me growing up with drums. I hope you enjoy this episode as much as I enjoyed making it.

 

You Will Hear About….

  • Touring in Canada.
  • Mushroom Fish n’Chips and cowboy boots.
  • How the podcast started with Jonathan Torrens and everything they have worked on together.
  • The early days of Jeremy’s drumming and starting with OLP.

 

Why Should You Listen?

First and foremost, this is just a fun and hilarious hang. Taggart & Torrens is a very casual and comical podcast, which I strongly recommend! I did want to capture the spirit of their program on this episode. A dash of interview amongst random conversation. There is by no means anything essential in this episode except for some good laughs.

 

Check out TnT’s new record Bahds

Canadianity: Tales From The True North Strong And Freezing

Taggart & Torrens Podcast

 

Photo Credit: Aaron McKenzie Fraser

 

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