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Drumeo Gab Podcast

Are ya tired of hearing, "so, like, uhh talk to me about how you started playing drums" in drumming podcasts? I'm gonna say, probably not as much as the guests are. I dunno, I think it's better to cut to the chase and explore pinpoint moments in their lives by forming curiosities around my research :0 IF YOU ARE DOWN FOR THAT; WELCOME! (Side Note: I strongly believe that the best part of the podcasting experience for listeners is the ability to connect with the host. So, don't be shy :)
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Now displaying: Page 6
Sep 2, 2018

Dylan Elise, native to New Zealand, is probably (and to a point, unfortunately) best known for his viral busking videos on YouTube from when he was a teenager, as well as his hi-hat trick performances. Here's the thing though...if that is all you know Dylan as you are missing out. Dylan is an extraordinary talent who plays for Blood, Sweat, and Tears and has done so for nearly four years. Bobby Colomby (the original drummer and co-founder of BS&T) actually noticed and auditioned Dylan because of those busking videos, which is kind of hard to believe considering the busking videos were an old representation of Dylan's playing and they were not musical. It was quite an opportunity, and it may not have happened if it weren't for technology.

 

In this interview, Dylan talks a lot about New Zealand culture, the process of landing the BS&T gig, his work visa struggles and just how difficult it is for a foreigner to stay in the United States, his experiences while busking, the fire in Chicago, and how he feels about his own playing.

 

As Stan Bicknell said to me, Dylan was considered as the child prodigy of NZ drummers. Dylan is a true player and was even homeschooled so it is safe to say that Dylan spent most of his life playing drums and that is simply the reason why he is so good. I also feel that Dylan flies under the radar amongst the company of other high-level players for some reason. I am not sure if it is because of his busking videos took precedence over his "real" stuff or what, but Dylan is so much more than what those busking videos illustrated to fans. He has developed into an incredibly musical, fast, powerful, and groovy player. His work with BS&T is a testament to what he is truly capable of and hence why he has been with them for almost four years, even despite the fact that Dylan would be an expensive option due to the fact that the band covers all of his immigration expenses. I really hope that the industry begins to take more notice of Dylan as an extraordinary talent.

 

Music and samples featured in this episode.

 

Dylan Elise drum solo LIVE with BS&T 2016

Dylan Elise with the Hipstamatics (fun fact...the bass player is Dylan's Sister) Recorded LIVE in Auckland, NZ

BS&T - Surreptitious

 

Dylan's Socials

Instagram | Facebook

 

Aug 26, 2018

Episode 92 of the podcast is a special one. For starters, this interview took place in the same place (and the same table) as my very first interview for DrumGAB and one of the three guests featured in this episode was Archie, who was the first person I ever interviewed for the podcast. So that is a lot of firsts that are being revisited for this episode. I guess I could go one step further by stating that this was my first "true" roundtable interview. So, now that's out of the way, I will now introduce the guests.

 

John Huff, Nicholas Elie, and Archie Gamble were the gentlemen who joined me at the table at The Scots Corner bar for this session. Each of them has a history of playing in London, ON, including myself. They all have their own unique perspectives and experiences with gigging, the scene, and forging a career with music.

 

John has been playing professionally for about six years, while he has played drums for much longer than that he had decided six years ago to pursue drumming as more of a vocational activity than simply a hobby. He is about to head out on a European tour with Sarah Smith and he is also responsible for writing a blog as well. The blog is the reason why I invited John to the table, as some of his thoughts that he writes were fodder for a good chunk of this interview. You can check at the bottom of these notes to read up on his blog.

 

Next is Nicholas who is currently drumming for the group Nimway. I have been buddies with Nicholas for several years (even in the audio clips featured in this episode you can hear Nick's voice several times). Just to indicate something to listeners, those musical snippets were recorded on my iPhone (yes just a phone) a few years ago in an attic where both myself and many other local bands used to rehearse in (oh the many times I have been up there over the years). In any case, those were improvised jams that we recorded one night for fun and I held onto them over the years and decided to insert them into this episode. Anyways, back to Nick. So Nick is a drummer's drummer. He is a passionate player who simply loves to play. He has been involved in many projects over the years and while he is often found performing around London, he does not consider it his vocation. He is a lot like me that way where he just wants to create musical projects and gig here and there and have fun, while of course being compensated for his time. But he has a day job and is content with just having music as part of his life but not his sole source of income.

 

Finally, we have Archie. So Archie has been gigging professionally since 1984. That is 34 years....and he has been playing drums for 41 years. In London, Archie is one of the most respected and admired players around and gigging has been Archie's primary source of income since he began his career in music. He has no education, no savings, no retirement plan, and now he is beginning to experience the trials and hardships of being a musician primarily. He recently turned 50 years old and he acknowledges that this was a big deal for him as he looked around at his life and what it consists of at this very moment. Looking to diversify and find a way to survive on music alone is at the forefront of his mind when considering his professional life. It is in some ways, bitter sweet. Archie has been through many incredible experiences that drumming and music provided to him, but on the other side of the coin it has left him with very little to sustain himself unless he gets a normal day job and he damn near refuses to do that. Think about it, he has never worked a normal day job in his life. Why would he ever want to start at 50!?

 

So having these three at the table provides an incredibly broad point of view that is rooted in considerable amounts of experience. Between all four of us at the table there is a century worth of experience with drumming. We discuss the industry, the scene locally in London, self-doubt, taking chances, our futures, and some realities to this life we choose to live. All in all, this is an episode that I felt I had to make. I was once very much a part of this music scene in London and then one day decided that I would try to make something on my own and look outside of this city for the results I was wanting. To create something for myself that involved something I knew I really connected with and I decided to call it DrumGAB. Two years later it feels good to reconnect with some folks in a place I know all too well to discuss some topics that I know are on people's minds. Big thanks again to John, Nicholas, and Archie for their time and honest input towards this interview. There are loads of takeaways from this one and it is presented in a way that is totally different from other episodes in the podcast's catalog.

 

John's Socials

Instagram | Website/Blog

 

Nimway Socials

Instagram | Facebook

 

Archie's Socials

Instagram | Facebook

 

DrumGAB Socials

Instagram | Website

Aug 20, 2018

Rich Stitzel is native to Texas but currently lives in Chicago and has been gigging professionally for in and around 25 years. He lives a fast-paced life in the world of music and is the definition of a musician on the grind.

 

Rich has played just about every type of gig imaginable and has seen a lot in his career which makes him such an incredible person to interview. He reminds us that even though we can become familiar with the hustle and different gigging situations, we also have no idea what each day may bring and how we have to respond.

 

He is responsible for creating the DrumMantra series and has recently developed his DrumMantra 3030 (30 minutes/day for 30 days) curriculum. He is specialized in polymeter rhythms and is completely enamored with rhythmic concepts. 

 

Click here to listen to Rich's DrumMantra podcast.

 

Rich's Socials

Instagram | Website

 

DrumGAB's Socials

Instagram | Website

Aug 12, 2018

NOTICE: Jeremy is putting together a fundraiser called "Beats for a Cause. Check out the link below to learn more about this fundraiser. He is trying to raise money to help fire victims in the Carr fires that are happening in Northern California.

 

Learn More About Beats For A Cause!

 

Jeremy "Walrus" Schulz is a teaching coach, professional drummer, and educator based out of Brooklyn, NY. He has performed and toured with bands such as Barbie Car and Mother Crone.

 

Jeremy shares some very compelling stories about how he started playing drums (this is maybe the most fascinating thing ever said in the show's history) and how music education, drumming, and working with his instructor Steve Smith (no not the Journey one) at Seattle Drum School of Music played a major role in his massive change of direction in life.

 

We hear about a lot of concepts that Jeremy uses in his day to day life that help him live a more purposeful life. I am certain that this episode will inspire anyone who listens to it.

 

Jeremy also wanted to offer the DrumGAB podcast community a 30% discount on his program. Listen at the very end of the episode to check out what he has been generous enough to offer listeners.

 

Jeremy's Socials

Instagram | Website

 

DrumGAB Socials

Instagram | Website

Aug 5, 2018

Reuben Spyker is a drummer from Abbotsford, BC who is an employee at Drumeo and also just released his own album titled "Forward" as the Reuben Spyker Quartet.

 

This episode of the podcast focuses on Reuben's creative process with improvisation, and why he needs to be in "the zone" with his music. We talk about how this album came to be and the process in recording the album, which was totally improvised with a group of musicians that had never played as a complete group together before and was captured live off the floor in a continuous five-hour recording session. Reuben then chopped it up and made it into an album and the results are fantastic. It is highly textural, organic, and executed with a strong command from each of the four musicians on their respective instruments. The conversation we had regarding the creative process was fun and interesting, as improv is Reuben's preferred method of performance.

 

Reuben is also an employee of Drumeo. His title is "community manager" so he handles emails, communicating with the members, helping Dave with his workload, making the guest instructors feel comfortable as they stay at the facility, and quite a few other tasks including developing lessons and so on. How he got involved with Drumeo was over the course of many years, in fact, because Reuben and Jared both live in Abbotsford and have for several years, they have been associated for quite a long time. But over the course of several run-ins and Reuben's interest in the company, eventually Reuben found his opportunity with the company and this has made him very happy with his situation career-wise. But there was a big question surrounding this. Whether it is a cop-out to serve another's dream. Whether it is better for all of us to become entrepreneurs and be our own boss, rather than working for someone else. Both Reuben and I have our thoughts about this and the dialogue surrounding this may help others feel more at peace with themselves if being an entrepreneur isn't in your wheelhouse. It takes the focus away from the noise we all see online where it seems like a trend to be an entrepreneur and that we shouldn't fuel the dreams of others, but rather our own.

 

Overall, this is among the stronger episodes in the DrumGAB library, if you ask me. It is refreshing, thoughtful, funny, and certainly entertaining. Below are links to listen to Reuben's new album "Forward".

 

 
Spotify link: https://open.spotify.com/album/5jxvSC4IO9qJtCGP0HqYEf
 
 
itunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/forward/1416475856?app=itunes&ign-mpt=uo%3D4
 
 
Apple Music: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/forward/1416475856?app=apple%20music&ign-mpt=uo%3D4
 
 
Google Play: 
https://play.google.com/store/music/album/Reuben_Spyker_Forward?id=Bbg3yyrb3jpqw4otmzduktyjofm
 
 
Reuben's IG
 
 
DrumGAB's Socials
 
Instagram | Website
Jul 29, 2018

Eddy Thrower is the drummer for popular UK rock group Lower Than Atlantis. In this chat we discuss band morale, touring situations, Eddy's clinic experiences, aliens, conspiracies, ghosts, and Travis Barker.

 

Eddy is an incredible player, whos singles alone are worthy of mention. He cannot read, or write music, and barely understands theoretically what it is he plays, but it goes to show that with a lot of heart and dedication to the instrument anything is possible.

 

When Tama approached him about doing a masterclass, he was a bit fearful of that because it is so far outside of his comfort zone. Once it was revealed that he didn't really understand theory, it all kinda makes sense why he was fearful. We go into this subject matter in quite a lot of depth.

 

He then shares an epic story of when LTA was touring North America and how they were robbed after a gig in a shady part of Montreal, Canada. Damn, even I thought Canada was better than this, but the story is one of tragic misfortune and an outcome that was better than what it could have been I suppose.

 

I learned that Eddy was fascinated with ancient history, aliens, and the unknown at large. We ended up swapping conspiracy, ghost, and other stories about the unknown and had a blast doing so. Never before has a guest got so excited about a subject on the show.

 

Then lastly we talk about a few run-ins Eddy has had with Travis Barker. This stuff is just legendary and a great way to conclude the episode.

 

Eddy's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | YouTube

 

DrumGAB's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | Website

Jul 22, 2018

Charlie Engen is a monstrous prog/metal drummer from the Twin Cities who plays for Scale The Summit and Ideology.

 

In this episode we discuss the mishap with his thumb and how time off to renew our sense of interest is good, but that it has to on our own terms and in this situation, Charlie did not want to be off the instrument but had to be in order for his thumb to heal. We talk about how we can get bored of our own playing, social media returns, the importance of being ourselves and not allowing outside feedback that is negetive to influence our own ideas about our art, practicing with a metronome, and a crazy story at the St. Paul's Cathedral.

 

This conversation will hopefully help drummers get a better sense of their path with the instrument and realize that by being ourselves and honouring our own creativity is ultimately the most important rule of thumb when we develop ourselves around this instrument.

 

Charlie's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | YouTube | Website

 

DrumGAB's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | Website

 

St. Paul's mishap video *MUST WATCH!*

Jul 8, 2018

Forrest Rice is the drummer for bands Covet and The Illustrative Violet. We recorded this interview via Skype while Forrest was driving to San Jose in his Toyota. He was also enjoying a Vanilla Latte on ice from Starbucks, although it was made for Alex. We still don't know who Alex is.

 

So Forrest is a well known and revered drummer on the gram, but I wouldn't say that he is an "Instagram Drummer" necessarily. He spends a lot of time in real life situations performing, practicing and filming videos beyond his jam room. He had never been on a podcast before, which I still cannot believe, and he hasn't had a published article on him since his 2014 GC Drumoff success. With all of that being said we definitely take a deep dive into his past and how he came to be with the instrument. Most people know that I generally don't take this route with interviews, but considering he has never shared that stuff in an interview and he has lots of fans who would likely want to hear about that, I decided we ought to take that road.

 

Some takeaways in this episode are regarding his approach to playing, his practice routine, his past with "shedding", how he approaches the band setting, finances, and how to get flowing around the kit. This is actually a very "drummy" episode, which is also rare on this podcast. Forrest is a legit geek with the drums and we straight up nerd out for almost two hours and have lots of laughs along the way as I accompanied him on his drive. There were A LOT of technical difficulties and this was very time consuming to edit, (I think calls dropped around six times during our interview and took over three hours to record) but I am happy with the results and it turned out just fine.

 

Forrest's Socials

Instagram | Facebook

 

DrumGAB's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | Website

Jul 1, 2018

Steve Lyman is a jazz musician from Salt Lake, Utah who has studied under jazz giants Ari Hoenig, and John Riley. Steve is a professor, clinician, and artist who manages to keep a very full schedule with little time off it would seem.

 

In this episode, we explore some deep musical concepts, the importance of being a student whilst remaining as a teacher, how our society limits us due to the projection of shame and guilt for anyone who focuses on their own wellness, and many other deep subjects. Steve also had a close encounter with death recently and so we reflect on that as well and how that may have changed his perspective.

 

Steve has an online series that he calls "Drumset Mastery" that he launched back in February of this year that may be of interest to you. The link to check that out is HERE.

 

Steve's Socials

Instagram | Website

 

DrumGAB's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | Website

Jun 24, 2018

Cameron Carbone is a drummer from Austin, TX who performs with CYTERA and also a brand new project called Alter Mind. Along with performing, Cameron also teaches upwards of thirty students and is also a content creator.

 

I spoke to Cameron a couple of months ago over Skype and got to know him and his situation over the course of our chat. Because of our talk, I thought that a conversation on the podcast would be a good way to indicate to people what he had been going through and what he was doing about it. Most of us realize that sometimes life throws us curveballs and Cameron had some thrown at him. As Cameron explains in the interview, his life at the moment isn't at all what he was expecting. He mentions that he is thinking a lot about his future and what he wants that to look like, however, sometimes things are out of our control and even when we try our best to create the desired outcome it doesn't always work out that way.

 

So in this episode, we discuss the concept of self-awareness quite a lot. We both relate to the subject matter to help provide some real perspectives and some real solutions as well.

 

Cameron's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | YouTube

 

DrumGAB's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | Website

 

 

Jun 17, 2018

Ronn Dunnett is a colorful character who I had the great pleasure to finally meet at Victoria Drum Festival this year. He is a one-man show who is responsible for some of the finest instruments crafted in our industry today. Both with his Dunnett Classic Drums line and his continuation of the George Way legacy, Ronn pours love and care into each creation. He has high standards and does not sway off the path of excellence, as he has been known to be quite outspoken about certain aspects of the drum industry on social media and is misunderstood sometimes in the tone of his message. As we said (off-air) in our pre-chat, he is the guy who kicks the ball when others stand around waiting for someone else to take action. 

 

The bulk of our conversation is focused on his revival of George Way Drum Company. In 2006, Ronn decided to restore the old company and honor its roots and tradition. Ronn is very interested in the history of the man, the story of the company and George Way, and the brand both in its innovation and focus on quality and sincerity of the products. Ronn realizes just how much responsibility he is faced with and he holds a high standard to honor what George might have wanted in regards to what the company would eventually evolve into if George were still alive. Listening to Ronn speak on this is very interesting and it says a lot about his character and what he values.

 

Beyond that we talk some shop, have some good laughs, discuss his lifetime acheivement, and contemplate the future of Ronn's companies and when he may decide that it is time to live out the rest of his days outside of his "factory".

 

Audio is taken from Carter McLean's Drumeo lesson and a demonstration of the George Way birthday kit, played by Carter McLean.

 

Ronn's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | Website

 

George Way Website

 

DrumGAB's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | Website

Jun 11, 2018

Rob Mount is the drummer for the rock legend Lou Gramm, who is most famously recognized as the vocalist for Foreigner. Rob has been an active drummer for a great deal of time, although his big breakthrough gig with Lou did not happen for him until his 40's, which is rather late for a musician. Even though Rob didn't get his major gig until much later in life, it did not stop him from believing that it was possible. He always kept that part of his life hopeful and miraculously his big opportunity came along.

 

In this interview, Rob and I discuss the process of getting that gig, but in a much more conceptual way than the actual literal side of the story. We hypothesize about whether he could continue working his day job and gigging smaller gigs on the weekend forever. This is particularly interesting because Rob did sub in for Lou once when Lou's brother, Ben, was sick. After that, however, Rob had to wait a long time before another opportunity came along. It was a bit painful for him.

 

Further along the episode, we get into some very unlikely topics including propaganda, media, mental health, and some fundamental basics for human beings.  

 

Rob's Socials

 

Instagram | Website

 

DrumGAB's Socials

 

Instagram | Website

Jun 4, 2018

Tommy Igoe is an iconic figure in the drumming world with his long and fascinating career spanning from instructional DVD's (Groove Essentials), Broadway performances (Lion King), and a wide range of sideman and bandleader roles throughout the years. Son of Sonny Igoe, who was a well-known drummer from the bop era (Benny Goodman) Tommy found his calling for music very early in life. In fact, Sonny had wished Tommy not to follow in his footsteps, insisting that Tommy become a dentist or something more sustainable for his career. The rest is history as they say.

 

In this conversation, we discuss everything from the current state of affairs with our youth, parenting, passion, greatness, online education, what it takes to be a bandleader, and how Tommy feels about his career thus far and what he wishes to achieve in his future. It was recorded at the Marriot Inner Harbour Hotel restaurant in Victoria, British Columbia during the Victoria Drum Fest event. Recorded simply with a Zoom H6 recorder, we captured some interesting thoughts and points of view that is unfiltered, raw, and honest.

 

Performance audio courtesy of Drumeo

 

Tommy's Socials

 

Instagram | Website

 

DrumGAB's Socials

 

Instagram | Facebook | Website

May 28, 2018

Dali Mraz is a composer and drummer from the Czech Republic. He recently released his own record, titled Level 25, which features his own compositions that marries orchestral music and fusion to create a hugely unique sound. This record has taken Dali over two years to create and as he describes is a product of his journey these last two years. Dali is a fiercely passionate musician who does not compromise at all when it comes to his original compositions. But like everyone, he has to make a living somehow, so he does this by composing music for film scores and other contracted work that has nothing to do with drumming at all. He saves the drumming for his own projects, like Level 25. Dali also hosts clinic based camps with some of the worlds most well-recognized drummers in the world such as Todd Sucherman, Benny Greb, and Chris Coleman.

 

Dali is a true composer. He has been composing music since he was six years old and has won several awards for his work over the years. He is incredibly prolific and reminds me of people such as Frank Zappa. Just simply because of his daily routine of composing music and his level of passion for it. Like Zappa, who was an amazing guitarist, Dali is an absolute beast drummer. He possesses world-class abilities and an incredibly unique sound that I haven't heard anywhere else. I would easily be able to point out if it was Dali playing if I only heard a measure of music.

 

This interview gets quite deep into Dali's outlook on his work, why he is unable to compromise, and the names of his sheep.

 

Dali's Drumeo Lesson

 

Dali's Socials

Instagram | Website

 

DrumGAB's Socials

Instagram | Website

May 21, 2018

An interview with Ben O'Brien Smith and Cody Rahn who host the new drum based YouTube channel, Sounds Like A Drum. Full article, and socials are below.




Sounds Like A Drum Socials



Instagram | Facebook | YouTube

 

Cadence Independant Media Socials



Instagram | Facebook | Website




Ben’s Instagram | Cody’s Instagram




DrumGAB’s Socials


Instagram | Facebook | Website



Ben O’Brien Smith and Cody Rahn are the hosts and developers of a new content channel called Sounds Like A Drum. Both of these dudes have extensive experience in the music industry. Ben is a former employee of D’Addario for 6.5 years and during his time at D’Addario, Ben was in charge of the social networks of both Evans drum heads and Promark drumsticks. He also was involved with product development, which includes many of the innovations that we are all familiar with today from Evans including the UV1, Black Chrome, and Level 360 technology. It is also important to note that besides the multimedia end of the industry, Ben is also a drummer with over twenty years experience and also studied classical percussion at Crane School of Music. However, in the role of Sounds Like A Drum, Ben is primarily assuming the role of content creator, brand developer, and social media strategist through his company Cadence Independent Media. Due to Ben’s extensive knowledge of drumhead technology he also hosts some of the content that is focused on these subjects.




What Cody Rahn brings to the table is years of studio and live music performance experience where he has utilized his long-term obsession with tinkering with drums to find all of what they can offer him as a player. Cody presents incredibly informed methods in the Sounds Like A Drum YouTube series, and they tend to lean on more practical solutions, other than the whole "what you need to buy to get this to work" type of solution that finds its way into a lot of content usually. Together with Ben and Cody’s strengths, they have combined forces to create an incredibly insightful resource for the drumming community.




With podcasts, normally a host says that their episode is jammed packed with the good stuff. Almost every podcaster is really trying to convince you that you should listen to the show for a multitude of reasons. Whether it is because there is tons of information, or it is inspirational, or it was a natural conversation...you get the point. So it is difficult for me to write down exactly what this episode is without coming off as canned but believe me when I say this....actually let's back up just a second. If you listened to Episode 77 with Tim Buell you will have a good idea of how this episode with Ben & Cody went. It is again, kind of a textbook style episode. There are stories and it is fun and all that, but there are some things said in this episode that are basically giveaways to the audience and it is coming from Ben & Cody's long-term and professional experience. I was so happy with how easygoing, comfortable, professional, and value-packed this episode was.




You will learn about why the drum set's sound is so absolutely crucial. And it actually goes beyond just tuning methods, and drum head/drumstick, the drum kit, the cymbal selections, etc. Cody, in particular, gets into some detail about the sound of someone's playing. The sound is such an overall thing that is made up of many small components. The interpretations, the application of creativity, the execution of technique, the implication of time and feel, and of course every little piece of hardware, and of course the musical instruments that you selected to play. If a musician is thoughtful and caring about their sound and can also do everything else well that is required, you will be in good shape hopefully. So make sure you listen closely to this episode and take some mental notes.

May 14, 2018

Well, it's time for round two with my dude Scott Pellegrom. You may recall our chat back in Episode 23. That episode was a fun and memorable hang and funny enough, we kept running into each other at NAMM 2018 and every time we'd end up chatting for long periods of time. It turns out that we both had a mutual interest in chatting again on the podcast, so that's a bonus. It's always a pleasure having Scott on the show.

 

If you listened to our original episode and enjoyed it, this is probably not going to disappoint. In this session, we catch up and chat about what has happened in a year's time, including some cool events happening with Dream cymbals that Scott is heavily involved in developing. Scott also talks a bit about how he is finding himself as an artist and musician more and more as well.

 

This episode is actually quite "drummy" for this podcast. We discuss a lot about drumming and some creative approaches to playing. But of course, with Scott, it gets deep and conceptual. There is a very interesting way that he looks at drumming and music, it is a unique approach and it's worth giving consideration to adding to one's creativity. We also talk about destiny and where Scott falls on that one. Scott also talks about how he feels about society and what he would change if he could.

 

With Scott, it's all convo....no interview really. He just has a tendency to say a lot of really compelling shit and I kept having questions for him. There is so much of what I had prepped that I didn't touch and then a bunch of improvised questions that just came to me while we chatted. This is a great little episode and I highly recommend it. It's good for you.

 

Scotty's Socials

 

Instagram | Website

 

DrumGAB's Socials

 

Instagram | Facebook | Website

May 6, 2018

Tim Buell is a drummer based out of Nashville, TN who studied at Belmont University and has worked with many artists over the years including Remedy Drive, Gloriana, The Grand Hotel, and Brinley Addington but over the last couple of years, Tim has focused on making his living from home using the internet. He is a great example of someone who has managed to creatively find a way to leverage his exceptional talents to make his living at home as an artist/musician.

 

In this episode we discuss whether or not music school is worthwhile, social media balance, the intent behind people's actions on social media, the positive effects of deep work, whether drummers are entrepreneurs, and the balance between money and the stress that is associated with making more of it. This episode is lengthy, deep, inspiring, and overall it is a healthy perspective on some subjects that are rarely tackled by anyone in the drumming podcast scene. Take notes on this episode.

 

Samples in the episode include:

 

Fallin' by Madlib

 

Simon Sinek on Millennials interview

 

Drumming performances by Tim Buell

 

Tim's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | YouTube | Website

 

DrumGAB's Socials

Instagram | Facebook | Website

May 1, 2018

Nick Baglio is an incredibly skilled drummer hailing from Raleigh, NC who is the owner and operator of The Fill Station studio. He also plays drums for a variety of artists including the jazz trio The Hot at Nights, The Foreign Exchange, Nicolay, Laura Reed, Boulevards, and Roosevelt Collier. He also teaches drums privately and through Skype.

 

In this interview, we explore the new release "Glaciers" by Nicolay and The Hot At Nights, which Nick had performed on. We discuss his childhood with music and his Father's studio "Power Tracks". We take a look at music schools and what value they provide and whether or not musicians are better off learning as cost-free as possible and instead investing in educational programs such as business, graphic/web design, etc. to fuse creatively to our music creating a more self-sufficient means for our careers as musicians.

 

I then go on to explain how I feel entrepreneurship is on the rise of popularity but whether it is nothing more than young people migrating their social media addictions over to business oriented pages and whether or not that is truly a business or not. This segment of the interview is rather harsh in its delivery but believe me when I say it is all out of passion on the subject. I have serious concerns about social media addiction. I feel that many people are being distracted and "deep work" is not happening as often as it should be because of social media distractions. Please read my essay on this subject on my website www.drumgab.com under this episode. You can read in detail about my feelings on this subject.

 

The last portion of the interview is in regards to The Fill Station, which is Nick's home studio that he provides drum tracks, lessons, and produces his content from. Nick is fairly new to engineering and before The Fill Station he had no experience with it, so I had to ask about how scared he was with investing in thousands of dollars in recording equipment and how the experience has been so far with learning the trade.

 

You can listen to Glaciers by Nicolay and The Hot At Nights here.

 

Nick's Socials

 

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DrumGAB's Socials

 

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Apr 22, 2018

Ralph Rolle is the current and long standing drummer for Nile Rodgers and Chic. He has worked with legendary artists such as Lady Gaga, Elvis Costello, Al Green, Sting, Slash, Queen Latifah, Erykah Badu, D’Angelo, Chaka Khan, and Lauryn Hill to name a few.

 

We discuss his cookie company The Soul Snacks Cookie Company, how he landed the Chic gig (which spans a thirty year time frame), a great story about how Ralph became endorsed with Yamaha through an encounter with the great Steve Gadd, and his experiences as the house drummer for the Apollo Theatre that spanned nearly two decades. We round off the interview with a heartfelt story about the NY Lancers Drum and Bugle Corps and the corps director, Carmelo Saez.

 

Ralph's Socials

 

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DrumGAB's Socials

 

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Apr 15, 2018

Matt Davis creates audio/video presentations using found footage and sampling original drum performances from the likes of Paul Mabury, Mike Johnston, Aaron Sterling, Dan Mayo, Ash Soan, Brody Simpson, Steve Nadler and many others. Since August of 2017, Matt has created over 200 of these short videos.

 

Audio samples for the podcast are sourced from the following....

 

Bloody Well Right by Supertramp

Heather and her Husband

Monty Python's Flying Circus

The Residents One-Minute Movies

A NASA recording of the Sun

Harmony Korine interview with Dave Letterman

Bunny Boy playing accordian in Gummo

Bjork 1988 interview where she disassembles a TV

DJ Shadow Endtroducing... Best Foot Forward and Changeling/Transmission 1

 

The clips I selected of Matt's Instagram feature the following drummers.....

 

Mike Johnston

Ash Soan

Brody Simpson

Mark Guiliana

Steve Nadler

Dan Mayo

Aaron Sterling

 

Matt's Instagram

 

DrumGAB's Socials

 

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Apr 8, 2018

EMAN (Emmanuel Cervantes) is the current touring drummer for the pop artist Andy Grammer. This interview was captured in the tour bus at The Phoenix Concert Theatre in Toronto, ON.

Recorded on April 2, 2018

 

EMAN's Socials

 

Instagram | Website

 

DrumGAB's Socials

 

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Apr 1, 2018

Drummer and music educator, Juan "Carlito" Mendoza is famously known as the 2012 Guitar Center Drum Solo Grand Champion. That YouTube video has over 3.5 million views. Juan has also written his own educational book titled, Rudiment Creativity Vol. 1: Rolls and Paradiddles. Volume Two is planned to be the works this coming fall.


 
In this interview we discuss the importance of patience, being genuine and authentic and why having a creative outlet is beneficial for people.

Recorded March 30, 2018

 

Juan's Socials

 

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DrumGAB Socials

 

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Mar 25, 2018

The story told in this podcast with Devin Sumner is one that so many drummers, musicians, and entrepreneurs can relate to. Maybe you have just begun your quest with little to no feedback on whether your idea will work, or you have already cleared your first major milestone and by receiving those affirmations you become even more dedicated to your brand and vision. Where ever you are in your journey, this podcast will probably spark a reminder of where you are heading and where you have already been.

 


So Devin had never been interviewed for a drumming podcast before, which I still cannot believe because he is an amazing drummer and he has a pretty steady following on Instagram. But regardless of that, I gotta say that I am so glad that I set this one up. The reason is that he has an incredible story and he was so forthcoming with the honest truths of his journey and I am certain that a lot of people can likely relate to this story and understand it. As a side note, I always enjoy when people are transparent about their life because how are we to believe that anyone succeeds in their first attempt at anything? It is not realistic to think that, nor should anyone assume that people get to where they are without some bumps along the way. With that being said, Devin explains how he moved in with Mike Johnston for a year in Sacramento and in the beginning stages of his first attempt moving out to establish himself life was grand. He had left home for the first time ever and he was living with his hero. So what could go wrong, right!? To the outsiders looking in at Devin, it must have seemed larger than life. Devin explains that it was in fact quite the opposite for him. He felt a lot of pressure to "keep up" with Mike, not by comparing himself to Mike necessarily, but by having such a strong influence around him revealed many insecurities about himself. Overall, Devin got hit pretty hard with the first move to Sacramento and ended up moving back to Orlando and began living, what Devin would describe as being "a normal life."

 


What would follow for Devin was ultimately needed for him to understand the contrast of living as a pedestrian citizen, versus what he knew he was truly capable of achieving for himself. The truth is, Devin fell down and stayed there for a little while. He met a girl, they moved in together, prepared their lives for marriage, he went back to school, he quit drums for almost two years, and as he explains in the interview, he was very unhappy with his life.

 

So what do you do when life seems to have you in a checkmate? Do you assume defeat and say, "Well, I guess this just wasn't meant for me", or do you realize that there is something missing within you that you need to reobtain and pursue with more vigor than ever before? I hope you chose the latter.

 


Even though a person's journey is uncertain, we need to realize that by actively including our passions in our lifestyle brings a healthy state of mind and a purpose to us all. There is nothing worse than ignoring what will bring us success, and I don't mean financial, but rather the success of knowing that we are doing what is right for ourselves. If we as people recognize what we are meant to do and we work hard towards our goals we, in turn, become better people for our spouses, family, colleagues, and friends. We also become a beacon for other people to recognize what good can come from being aware of our interests and living through them.

 


With all of the people who admire Devin for his ability to play drums and teach drums to his students, what we ought to do is look at ourselves and relate to the reality of his progress in his career. Simply put, it didn't just "happen". He struggled. He gave up. He tried again, and eventually, he recognized his purpose with the instrument and he is now working harder than ever before to make sure that he stays the on the course.

 


Overall, I really enjoyed speaking with Devin. He is as humble and genuine as they come and his story is quite inspiring to say the least. This dude has seen a lot of shit in his life and I think he has used it to his advantage to build his character and to appreciate himself for how far he has come along in his journey with this instrument. I hope you all get a tingly feeling and that each of you relate to his story with your own.

 

Devin's Socials

 

Instagram

 

DrumGAB's Socials

 

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Mar 18, 2018

Modern Drummer magazine is something that most drummers grow up with. I remember watching the 2000 Modern Drummer Festival DVD over and over when I was a teen. I learned and tried to mimic so much of what I saw in that video, always trying to aspire to produce anything remotely similar to Billy Ward’s sound….and failing miserably of course. But, regardless of how it came out, the most important thing was that a lot of my inspiration that came from that video.

 

So speaking with Mike Dawson, who is the managing editor at Modern Drummer, I found that there was an association of nostalgia that came along with this interview. Like many of us, Mike grew up with the magazine as well and fortunately through hard work, a chain of fortunate events, and perhaps even a bit of luck, Mike found himself a seat at the Modern Drummer table.

 

In this conversation, which is important to note that this is much more of a conversation than an interview, we sprawl over so many different topics. Our chat ranges from how Mike found himself at Modern Drummer, the truth about how Mike felt initially about the Mike and Mike podcast, the fleeting muse of a musician, and parallel universes…yes you read that correctly.

 

During the conversation there are many moments where Mike and I discover we are so similar in ways and this lead to many improvised moments of true conversation and I feel that is the magic of podcasting. When you find a kindred spirit on your line and you just spend most of the time relating and deliberating about whatever comes to mind. This one is full of that.

 

I hope you enjoy this one and have some takeaways from it. I’ll catch you all next week!

 

Mike’s Socials

 

Instagram

 

DrumGAB’s Socials

 

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Mar 11, 2018

This interview session with Dom Famularo is one that I hold in high regard. As many of you know, Dom is Drumming's Global Ambassador. Dom has earned that title because for so many years he has traveled the globe sharing his wisdom, educating drummers and using his communication skills to motivate and inspire drummers to reach their full potential.

 

So, with this interview I really wanted to capitalize on the unique qualities that Dom holds. Through him I wanted to provide a message to listeners and that message is to find your passion and persevere. None of us who embark on following our passions have any real idea where it can take us but we all have to believe in what we do and why we do it. We have to understand that regardless of how long the journey takes to reach a destination, that we appreciate and enjoy our journey. By believing in ourselves and the unique gift that we hold, we can all succeed in what we are passionate about. Through hard work and genuine love for what we do, opportunities will cross our path eventually.

 

However, the opportunities will not come to you unless you dedicate yourself to your passions and persevere. Many people check out when the success they are striving for doesn’t happen as quickly as they had hoped and that is really unfortunate. The truth is that you need to be consistent and go into it thinking that it will take a while and you have to be okay with that. We all possess the ability to influence and impact people with our creative passions but it can take a lot of time before anything becomes established and where you can feel like you are going somewhere.

 

If your dreams aren’t being realized right away, don’t give up on them. Keep pushing and keep believing. The reason for doing it in the first place shouldn’t be about the money, the public success or the influence you have. It should be about you honouring what you body and mind need in order to thrive. We all have this and it is a shame if it is discarded because you haven’t reached the destination right away or because you have talked yourself out of it before you ever began.

 

I hope you read this and reference it to the conversation that I had with Dom. What is incredible is that great moments are awaiting you if you discover the vehicle that will take you there. We have one chance in life to live and to make differences within our circle of friends, family, colleagues, acquaintances and even possibly a large group of people. The power of believing both in yourself and your passions and following that is incredibly important if we want to limit the amount of regret we may experience later in life once time has run out. I encourage everyone that if there is a burning desire somewhere deep inside you to pursue a dream, DO IT! Why wouldn’t you? Why would you prefer to walk through life admiring others and then telling yourself you can’t be admirable too? Or that you can’t do something because someone else’s success seems so untouchable.

 

It all takes time and dedication and if you really love it, you too can empower others and yourself by taking action in your life. Chances are that everyone who had succeeded also failed many times and had to rebuild or rethink their path. Challenge yourself, don’t settle on mediocrity, believe in yourself and understand that this could take years to become what you have always wanted to be.

 

I hope you all enjoy this podcast and even re-listen later on if you need a boost in your spirit. This podcast has that quality to it. I have now recorded 69 podcast episodes and while they all feature takeaways, knowledge and wisdom…this is the episode that stands among them as the most valuable episode to date. Dom’s ability to address his thoughts, using words that have impact and delivering everything with conviction, I believe you too will find the power in this episode. Maybe this interview is the thing you need to light the fire in your belly and take charge of your passions and persevere.

 

Much love to all.

 

Drumming performances are by Dom Famularo

 

Dom’s Socials

 

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DrumGAB Socials

 

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